Forum

March 19, 2021

Panel Th1a

Day/Time: Thursday, May 13, 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM


Library Publishing and Scholarly Bibliographies: A Case Study

Presenters:

  • Ally Laird, Penn State University
  • Angel Peterson, Penn State University

Description:

The Pennsylvania State University Libraries Open Publishing Program publishes scholarly annotated bibliographies in partnership with units/departments within Penn State and editors across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Since early 2020, we have almost doubled our production of bibliographies with both published and in progress projects, bringing our catalog up to twelve publications. We use the Drupal Biblio module to publish these annotated and searchable bibliographies, some of which are used by libraries and organizations around the world. We have learned a lot about scholarly bibliography publishing over the past five years and have used that knowledge to create a bibliography publishing workflow that ensures a timely and thorough process from the initial consultation to the final publication launch. In this session, we wish to highlight some of our bibliographies and discuss the publishing process, including the proposal review by our publishing board, consultations process with the editors, the content review and proofreading process, pain points in content organization and keyword searching, the creation and addition of content to our Drupal bibliography websites, and final publication. The publications we will highlight range in topic from indigenous knowledge for agriculture and rural development; utopian literature in the English language; and memoirs and primary sources documenting Polish Jews fleeing the Soviet Union during World War II. Attendees will come away from this session with an understanding of the scholarly bibliography publishing process at Penn State and proposed metrics for success.


Analyzing the content of the publications of the National Library and Archives of Iran and examining the degree of compatibility of their subjects with the approval of the Publishing Council of the organization: a study of books published between 2009-2019

Presenters:

  • Foroozan Rezaeinia, Publishing Expert in National Library and Archives of Iran
  • Somaye sadat Hashemi, Reference Librarian at National Library and Archives of Iran

Description:The National Library and Archives of Iran (NLAI) are a scientific, research, and service providing institution which was established in 1937. The Publishing Institute of the NLAI is one of the affiliated institutions of this organization, which was established in 1990.

Among the duties of publishing are reviewing and approving authorship, translating and publishing printed and manuscript works on Iran and Islam, especially the Islamic Revolution, research resources and library and information sciences, and publishing works compiled by different departments of the NLAI, including bibliographies, researches, and journals.

One of the goals of the organization’s publication is to provide a national model for library and archival publishing through the publication of scientific research resources; planning, ‌ coordinating and creating unity of procedure in the field of publishing activities of the organization; preparing of specialized works in the fields of knowledge and information sciences, ‌archival and documentary studies and researches such as subject headings, classifications, thesauruses, handbooks, sources of oral history, etc.

The purpose of this study is to analyze the content of what the NLAI has published during the years 2009-2019. The number of books published in these years is 64 which will be reviewed by qualitative research method and using checklist. The subject of the book is based on the information of the Iranian National Bibliography.


Data For Good: Open Journals @ Appalachian

Presenter:

  • Agnes Gambill, Appalachian State University

Description:

Data journals provide the academic community with high-quality, peer-reviewed datasets, data analyses, and data standards, yet few are in existence compared to the extensive number of traditional scholarly journals. The value of data journals is immense as it provides contributors and researchers with the ability to build upon openly published data sets, something that is integral to robust open science practices.

This presentation will discuss a case study of launching an open access publishing program to support the publication of two new open data journals at Appalachian State University, an R2 institution in the University of North Carolina System. The new initiative is a joint collaboration between Appalachian State University, the University of Arkansas, and SAS Institute. The data journals in question aim to publish articles and associated datasets that support one of the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. This presentation will cover project timelines, costs associated with getting started, legal considerations, data storage options, and using the PubPub platform.


March 19, 2021

Panel We4

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 12, 4:00 PM to 5 PM


Choosing Formats for Accessible E-books and E-journals: An EPUB3/HTML5 Case Study

Presenter:

  • Race MoChridhe, Atla

Description:

While PDF remains the industry standard for preparing print outputs, changes in publishing technology and in legal frameworks have increased the demand for other formats. Despite widespread acknowledgement of the accessibility and mobile device compatibility advantages of XML- and HTML-based file types over PDF, however, there is little guidance available for library publishers for selecting among these alternatives. Based on Atla Open Press’s recent accessibility self-audit, this session will present key factors to consider in choosing a digital-first publication format—including accessibility compliance, device compatibility, portability, and differing reading cultures across books and journals among the academic disciplines—and share reasoning and results from Atla Open Press’s deployment of EPUB3 and direct HTML5.


Open Access(ibility): Collaborating with Editors to Ensure Accessible Content

Presenter:

  • Josh Cromwell, University of Southern Mississippi

Description:

Many library publishing programs rightly laud the value of Open Access in their endeavors, but this largely focuses on paywalls, and paywalls are not the only barrier to access. For example, users with visual impairments may need to rely on screen readers or other tools to utilize a publication, and if the document has not been optimized for these technologies, such readers may still be left out. It is essential that library publishing programs take these users into account when developing their workflows.

In late 2020, our library-led publishing program began the process of reviewing the journals published through our repository to see if all of the publications met accessibility standards. After identifying any needed changes, we began collaborating with editors to identify necessary workflow changes and provide training sessions tailored to each journal depending on its needs. This presentation will highlight the steps we took to identify needed changes, the process for training and remediation thus far, and a discussion of next steps.


March 19, 2021

Panel We1

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 12, 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM


How DOAJ disseminates metadata from your open access journal to key discovery services worldwide

Presenter:

  • Dom Mitchell, Operations Manager, DOAJ

Description:

DOAJ works with all the major discovery services. All article metadata uploaded to DOAJ is available for free. It is collected and disseminated around the world. Why is this important? DOAJ is the world’s most diverse directory of open access journals. We have a long tail of small single journals that represent the true nature of open access publishing globally. Visibility for these journals is key to survival and being in indexed in DOAJ can help with that. This short presentation will show how this is achieved and why this is important.


Save our Search: Ways to improve online journal discoverability

Presenters:

  • Jennifer Kemp, Head of Partnerships at Crossref
  • Brian Cody, Scholastica CEO and Co-founder
Description:
Publishing journal articles online is like releasing them into an ocean of content brimming with discovery opportunities — but also some potential perils. To prevent articles from getting lost at sea and increase overall journal visibility in the overcrowded scholarly landscape, publishers must ensure readers can easily find their content when surfing the web and online databases. How can you improve the discoverability of the journals you publish? During this session, Crossref’s Head of Partnerships Jennifer Kemp and Scholastica CEO and Co-founder Brian Cody will discuss:
  • Steps to assess your current article discovery status
  • Tips to enrich your article-level metadata for better indexing outcomes
  • Search engine optimization dos and don’ts

Not a Needle in a Haystack! Increasing Journal Discoverability

Presenter:

  • rachel lee, eScholarship Publishing, California Digital Library

Description:

The key goal of open access is the widest dissemination of research, unrestricted by a paywall. Simply making content freely available, however, does not guarantee a broad readership. Ensuring that articles are easily findable should be a necessary component of any OA journal’s long-term sustainability plan. With readers resorting to a small selection of search tools (Google Scholar, JSTOR, Web of Science, library finding aids), what steps must a journal take to ensure that it is ‘in the mix’ for researchers?

On a practical level, building out a discoverability strategy is a significant effort. Under-staffed and thinly-resourced journals may not be able to dedicate additional time to delving into the broader mechanics of discoverability and understanding reader behavior. So what can be done? 

While this session will ask more questions that it answers, its aim is to surface some of the unique challenges of discoverability for OA journals, to suggest some steps to take to increase visibility, and to discuss whether such activities can, or should, be scaled. 

Questions will include: Which are the most important discovery venues? Could these efforts be coordinated and scaled across multiple publishers or journals? Are there technical hurdles that can be overcome with best practices? 

The presentation will offer food for thought as well as practical steps to improving the discoverability of your journal content for researchers. 


March 19, 2021

Panel Tu4b

Day/Time: Tuesday, May 11, 4:00 PM to 5 PM


Migration and More: Moving from DigitalCommons

Presenters:

  • Laura Baird, Systems & Applications Librarian, Pacific University
  • Johanna Meetz, Publishing & Repository Services Librarian, The Ohio State University

Description:

Pacific University transitioned from BePress’s DigitalCommons to Ubiquity’s Hyku and publishing platforms between 2018 and 2020. We migrated journals that were published in Digital Commons as well as the content in the institutional repository itself. When the transition was made from DigitalCommons to Ubiquity’s publishing platform, Pacific also reduced the number of journals published from 7 to 3. This presentation will share the entire process of that transition including selection, design decisions, migration, and user adoption. We will discuss the lessons learned, workload commitment, and recommended roles for similar migration projects. We will also share a brief overview of differences between the platforms and how these changes impacted user experiences. As one of the first institutional users of Ubiquity’s Hyku, these experiences may inform future migrations.


After the migration: What editors like (and miss) after moving from bepress to OJS

Presenters:

  • Kristin Hoffmann, University of Western Ontario
  • Emily Carlisle-Johnston, University of Western Ontario

Description:

Between 2017 and 2020, librarians at the University of Western Ontario migrated 26 journals from the bepress Digital Commons (DC) platform to PKP’s Open Journals System (OJS) platform. We moved journals to OJS largely because we, and some editors, were concerned about potential implications of Elsevier’s acquisition of bepress in August 2017, but we also expected that OJS would give editors more flexibility and autonomy.

Have editors experienced the benefits we anticipated with OJS? How has their work changed as a result of the move? What new challenges do they face? Our session will draw on a post-migration survey of editors to answer these questions. Because some editorial teams now have several years’ experience working with OJS, while others have only a few months (due to turnover or when they migrated), we will address the learning curve that editors may experience over time as they adjust to a new platform.

We will draw on our experiences working with editors to share what our publishing support looked like with DC and how it has changed since moving to OJS. For example, with DC, bepress staff provided most of the technical and operational support for editorial teams. With OJS, library staff provide more direct support. We will discuss the implications this has had for our work as a library publisher, and how it informs the development of our publishing services.

Sessions at previous LPFs have discussed platform migrations, including migrations from bepress to OJS. Those sessions have focused on the processes involved in migrations. While we will briefly do the same, our presentation will largely emphasize the experiences of journal editors and librarians with the two platforms. This will also inform library publishers who are determining which platform is best for their publishing program, based on their resources and objectives.


A Consortium Approach to Library Publishing Via the Open Journal System and the Texas Digital Library

Presenters:

  • Taylor Davis-Van Atta, University of Houston
  • Lea DeForest, Texas Digital Library
  • Susan Elkins, Sam Houston State University
  • Bruce Herbert, Texas A&M University
  • David Lowe, Texas A&M University
  • Alexa Hight (chair), Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi
  • Laura Heinz, Texas Tech University
  • Kristi Park, Texas Digital Library
  • Denyse Rodgers, Baylor University
  • Laura Waugh, Texas State University
  • Justin White, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
  • Amanda Zerangue, Texas Woman’s University
  • Adrian Shapiro, Texas Woman’s University
  • Alex Suarez, Texas Digital Library
  • N. Woodward, Texas Digital Library

Description:

The Texas Digital Library is a collaborative consortium of Texas universities that builds capacity among its membership for ensuring equitable access to and preservation of digital content of value to research, instruction, cultural heritage, and institutional memory.  The Texas Digital Library supports the TDL Electronic Journals, where faculty members, libraries, and universities can produce refereed, open-access scholarly journals, ensuring the availability of important scholarship to researchers across the world. TDL Electronic Journals are powered by Open Journal Systems (OJS), an open-source journal management and publication software produced by the Public Knowledge Project.

In 2019, the TDL OJS User Group was formed.  TDL’s OJS Users Group is comprised of library liaisons for campus journals. The group works to create an active community among TDL’s users of the Open Journal System hosting service in the following ways:

  • By facilitating mutual support among library managers of the OJS hosting service, including the sharing of resources about library publishing policies and good practices to benefit from distributed expertise
  • By facilitating better communication between TDL staff and libraries using this service to identify emerging needs on specific campuses
  • By identifying areas of work that could be undertaken by member-led working groups

The goals for 2019-20 were to:

  • Use monthly meetings to develop knowledge around OJS 3
  • Develop two toolkits for journal managers including decision-making toolkit for prospective journal managers and a toolkit for starting a new journal

The user group benefited by reduced costs through shared IT resources and distributed expertise to better support the creation and management of open access journals.  In this talk we will discuss the function of the user group, as well as the costs and outcomes associated with a consortium approach to library publishing through the OJS system.


March 19, 2021

Panel Tu4a

Day/Time: Tuesday, May 11, 4:00 PM to 5 PM


Taking Open Textbooks Beyond Gen Ed: Building a New OER Publishing Model to Support Career and Vocational Education

Presenters:

  • Robert Hilliker, Rowan University
  • Marilyn Ochoa, Middlesex County College

Description:

In renewing the Open Textbook Program grants this past year, the U.S. Department of Education updated their Absolute Priorities to focus on addressing gaps in the “Open Textbook Marketplace.”  This reprioritization reflects the success of initiatives such as OpenStax and the Open Textbook Network in providing for general education courses as a way to maximize the financial impact of their efforts.  Our (now-funded) proposal to create a Community College-led, state-wide Open Textbook Collaborative in New Jersey seeks to fill an important need for Open Textbooks that support Vocational and Career Education programs, reducing the burdens borne, in many cases, by students from historically-disadvantaged groups and providing them with pathways to remunerative career opportunities in growth industries.  In this session, we will discuss our plans to develop a new model for career-oriented Open Textbook publishing based on a library-led collaboration between educational institutions, professional associations, and industry partners.


Scribbling in the Margins of the Scholarly Communication Notebook

Presenters:

  • Maria Bonn, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign
  • Josh Bolick, University of Kansas
  • Will Cross, North Carolina State University

Description:

Open education presents the opportunity to build participatory pedagogical communities. As DeRosa & Jhangiani (2017) observe, “embedded in [open education’s] social justice commitment to making college affordable for all students is a related belief that knowledge should not be an elite domain. Knowledge consumption and knowledge creation are not separate but parallel processes, as knowledge is co-constructed, contextualized, cumulative, iterative, and recursive.” That same inclusive principle should apply to teaching and learning about publishing.

We are developing an openly-licensed textbook that introduces and engages with issues in scholarly communication, to be released in 2021 by ACRL. As we undertake this work, we are aware that any static text will be hierarchical and limited. To open doors to the multiplicity of approaches and perspectives in the field, as well as reflect the dynamic nature of both open education and scholarly communication, we are developing a companion online community hub: the Scholarly Communication Notebook (SCN).

This session introduces the SCN, an IMLS funded project (LG-36-19-0021-19) aspiring to be the locus for an inclusive community of practice for teaching scholarly communication to emerging librarians. This LPF session will invite participants to bring their expertise to teaching and learning about publishing, with a particular eye to making an inclusive open resource.

We will offer a guided tour of the first version of the SCN and lead discussion about: ways to build a community that is open to and inviting for participants that reflect the diversity of scholars and scholarship; how the SCN can meet the needs of those scholars and benefit from the expertise of scholarly communication professionals; What is needed to make the SCN what DeRosa and Jhangiani call an “empowering, collaborative, and just architecture for learning”?


Community, Storytelling, and Good Metadata: Marketing Advice for OER Librarians

Presenter:

  • Leigh Kinch-Pedrosa, Pressbooks

Description:

Marketing in the open education world requires ethical practices that often conflict with the impulses of many traditional marketers. Installing a zillion cookies to track smartphone use and sending out targeted social media ads might prompt the usage of a product, but that would be unethical and out of place in higher education. Instead, marketers (in this case OER librarians) need to focus their efforts on community building, telling stories, and celebrating the hard work of OER creators. Telling the story of a new OER in a clear, honest, and vibrant way gives potential readers something to connect with and encourages them to share the product within their networks even if they are not directly invested in that book. This method is far more organic than a social media ad, and that honesty shines. In this presentation, Leigh Kinch-Pedrosa will share practical advice about how librarians and other OER practitioners can market OER to increase their adoption and extend their use, thus encouraging the enactment of the 5Rs (retain, remix, revise, reuse, redistribute). Drawing on her experience working with non-profit organizations (Rebus Foundation, Confabulation) and ethical edtech companies (Pressbooks), Leigh will explain key approaches to marketing education products and services in ethical, culturally respectful, and effective ways.


March 19, 2021

Panel Mo4b

Day/Time: Monday, May 10, 4:00 PM to 5 PM


Meet Rebus Ink: An open, values-driven research workflow tool for the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

Presenter:

  • Zoe Wake Hyde, Rebus Foundation

Description:

Rebus Ink is an open source research workflow tool, designed to support arts, humanities and social science researchers to manage and draw insights from their collected sources. With funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the project team is developing the tool and its supporting structures in line with open values. This includes facilitating open research practices, modelling organisational practices that are central to progressing an open agenda (releasing code with an open license, publishing reports and research findings openly etc.), and engaging with expansive notions of openness, transparency and community engagement to guide our way.

This session will begin by sharing our research into the problems facing researchers as they construct makeshift workflows for their digital and print content, then introduce Rebus Ink tool and its key features. It will then explore the design principles and guiding values for the project as a whole, and detail the ways in which the project team is seeking to contribute to the open ecosystem beyond the tool itself.

This starts with actively pushing against accepted “conventional wisdom” and the reproduction of existing patterns of research behaviour, instead taking a non-hierarchical approach to source collections, and creating output-neutral working spaces that value thinking and reflection as much as a journal article, book chapter or podcast script. It is furthered by a design approach that centres user agency, prioritises privacy and offers transparency to users around decisions made by the project team. It continues with a commitment to creativity and experimentation in business model design, prioritising sustainability and access over profit and exclusivity. And finally, it is underpinned by an organisational structure that models transparency and ethical labour practices.


Let’s Get Packing: How the Laurier Library partnered with the Bookstore and Printing Services to take over Coursepack Publishing

Presenters:

  • Lauren Bourdages, Copyright and Reserves Supervisor, Wilfrid Laurier University Library
  • Melanie Ross, Copyright and Reserves Associate, Wilfrid Laurier University Library

Description:

Course readings are of vital importance to university students. They’re a central element of teaching and learning. As traditional proprietary textbooks become more and more expensive instructors are trying to find ways to move away from them. Enter printed course packs and electronic course reserves, two overlapping services provided by most post-secondary institutions. These services are even more important in light of the current move to widespread remote and online learning caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. In the 2018 academic year, the Course Reserves office at the Laurier Library became a publisher for the first time as a partnership between the Library, the campus Bookstore, and the University’s Printing Services department was realised. After a year of work building a process, the Library took over the copyright clearance and publication of the university’s print course packs intending to transfer as many course packs from print to digital using the library’s course reserves service. After almost three full years what have we learned from this partnership? In this presentation, we’ll cover those lessons along with why we took on the publishing role, how it worked, and how things stand during the pandemic.


Community Espress-ion: the Espresso Book Machine, public libraries, and the development of creative communities

Presenter:

  • Elizabeth Murtough, University College Dublin

Description:

The public library plays an important role in ongoing efforts to facilitate civic and creative engagement in connected communities. According to Conrad (2017), the library has the potential to expand engagement efforts especially in the publishing sector. While a lesser discussed area of research relative to university library publishing, public library publishing, as evidenced by Kniffel (1989) and Williams (1987), has a long, dynamic history as a medium for community engagement and the development of richer localised collections. As Conrad (2017) argues, public library programs that make self- or micropublishing available can amplify the role of the library as a ‘true archive’ of its locality. Consequently, public library publishing programs can mirror Stanley’s (2007) claim of the role of scholarly library publishing in challenging the master narrative and creating space for voices and ideologies otherwise institutionally marginalized.

At present, the most commonly used tool for print-on-demand publishing is the Espresso Book Machine (EBM), a 2003 technology spearheaded by publisher and editor Jason Epstein. The EBM is capable of printing a vast catalogue of books on demand through its EspressNet database, but can also be used by self-publishers and micropublishers for small print runs (Koerber, 2012; Espresso Book Machine, 2015). Situating the latter use within the Maker Movement, Koerber argues that the EBM can empower communities through creative collaboration and connected learning. This tool, therefore, has the potential to expand creative community engagement where deployed within, and leveraged by, local public libraries.

This presentation will use program and cost models as well as community responses for extant EBM installations to look forward to a future where such mechanisms are available to expand the range of locally published voices and the role of the library in community development. A bibliography will be provided to interlocutors to facilitate further thinking on the topic.


March 19, 2021

Panel Mo4a

Day/Time: Monday, May 10, 4:00 PM to 5 PM


Publishing Undergraduate Research: From Serendipity to Strategy

Presenters:

  • Sarah Frankel, University of Louisville
  • Rachel Howard, University of Louisville

Description:

A combination of ambitious and motivated first-year students, a newly-formed IR Advisory Board including members of a university’s strategic planning subcommittee, and a pandemic led to the rapid expansion of the University of Louisville’s open access offerings of undergraduate research in 2020.

Our small team’s responsiveness to the requests from multiple fronts to showcase undergraduate research meant modifying our institutional repository’s collection policy; adapting author agreements; preparing MOUs; and communicating with stakeholders ranging from the Provost’s office to novice journal editors to software support, all while working remotely.

The juried poster session events and open access journals produced by undergraduates and presented on our repository have brought the library publishing program positive publicity and a mention in the new university strategic plan. The process has prompted us to improve our documentation of other IR procedures and relationships, laying a stronger, more sustainable foundation for the repository as a whole.


Partnering with Student Journals to Increase Visibility and Discoverability

Presenters:

  • Omar Dewidar, University of Ottawa Journal of Medicine
  • Jeanette Hatherill, University of Ottawa Library
  • Zacharie Saint-Georges, University of Ottawa Journal of Medicine

Description:

Student-run journals are often significant pieces of an academic library’s publishing or hosting program that offer graduate and undergraduate students valuable experiential learning opportunities related to various aspects of scholarly publishing. However, the student-run nature of these journals can pose unique challenges for their library partners with an often-higher editorial turnover than their faculty counterparts. Since 2013, the University of Ottawa Library and the student-run University of Ottawa Journal of Medicine (UOJM) have been partnering on projects to increase the journal’s visibility and discoverability. This session will highlight some successful past projects and present the progress of a current project that seeks to have the journal indexed in PubMed. Representatives from the journal’s editorial team will share some best practices and current challenges related to managing a journal while pursuing full time studies. Participants will also gain insight into the important role the Library can play as a keeper of institutional memory for student journals.


The Pursuit of High Research Activity Classification: Library/Learning Commons Support for Student Publishing

Presenters:

  • Linda Cifelli, Kean University
  • Craig Anderson, Kean University

Description:

As a university pursues R2 Carnegie research classification, the provision of support for publishing efforts by members of its community plays a significant role in the pursuit of that goal. While faculty members are prime candidates for such services, the university’s research classification goals are also well served by support for student publishing.

This presentation focuses on the development and implementation of an integrated set of strategies by one institution’s library and affiliated learning commons units in an effort to nurture publishing by undergraduate and graduate students. These strategies combine outreach conducted through various modalities, ranging from live virtual meetings and workshops to informational text and multimedia content embedded on the websites and other platforms of various university stakeholders.

A librarian embedded with programs that facilitate faculty-mentored research accomplishes a number of goals, including helping students access library and other information resources and also guiding students to the writing support that will help them successfully share the results of their scholarly and creative projects. In addition, an online library/learning commons module available to all students via their learning management system provides intrusive engagement through easy access to asynchronous resources that support development of information literacy, communication literacies, and related student learning outcomes when they write papers as the culmination of their scholarly research.

Outreach efforts across the university emphasize the publishing opportunities available to students through the university’s own open-access student journal, published on a digital learning commons platform.

By helping students to understand the academic and professional development benefits of publishing their work and by providing a digital platform through which research conducted by undergraduate and graduate students may be shared, the university will advance its efforts to increase overall campus-wide research activity and to achieve recognition for high research activity.


March 19, 2021

Panel Mo1b

Day/Time: Monday, May 10, 1:15 PM to 2:15 PM


Growing Knowledge in Living Handbooks: The Open-Access Platform PUBLISSO

Presenters:

  • Gregor Schumann, ZB MED – German National Library of Medicine
  • Uta Woiwod, ZB MED – German National Library of Medicine

Description:

This presentation introduces the audience to the “Living Handbook” project, an open-access publishing format for academic research in medical science/life sciences. Operated by ZB MED (German National Library of Medicine), Germany’s prominent library for life sciences, the project was designed to provide evolving science with international visibility and a sustainable ‘home‘ within the world of open access: The Handbooks’ architecture allows their content to grow alongside the achievements of the scientific fields they cover – chapters can be continuously added, scratched or updated without much ado.

Thus, our way of open-access publishing enables a fast-track, professional, and long-term exchange of scientific knowledge. By providing individual PIDs and ensuring citability by an accessible version history, it functions as a living host that combines common values and standards for scientific publishing: Quality-management workflows were established on both sides of the publishing process, high-quality academic research is guaranteed by peer reviewing and accompanied by editorial quality assurance. Scientists from all over the world are invited to connect their knowledge to the Handbooks‘ contents, which can be accessed by Internet users without any paywall and at any chosen time.

Based on the Content Management System Drupal, the Living Handbook project was built into the online publication platform PUBLISSO, also hosting ZB MED’s very own repository. The platform has already been in use for more than four years and is subject to continuous development. Genuinely developed as an open-source application, other libraries or institutions are welcome to use the system for their own publishing ideas and even develop it according to their specific needs.


Developing a Press Approach to Omeka S with the Teams Module

Presenters:

  • Alexander Dryden, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Daniel G. Tracy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Description:

This presentation explores user experience challenges faced by authors and library publishers when using Omeka S as a platform to publish digital exhibits curated by scholars, and a solution developed locally and available for reuse: the Omeka S Teams module. Omeka S offers a major advance over Omeka Classic in its ability to host multiple sites, making it possible to publish multiple scholar-created exhibits without maintaining multiple servers and installs. The Illinois Open Publishing Network at the University of Illinois Library began using Omeka S as part of a suite of platforms for long-form publications by authors, in this case for curated exhibits with analytical essays attached. However, a key challenge quickly became apparent: Omeka S assumes that the different sites will still maintain a shared pool of media assets, meaning all authors experience the assets of other authors as back-end “clutter” obstructing their work. Even more seriously it creates circumstances where one author may edit or even delete another author’s assets.

The Teams module addresses these concerns by introducing a new class of object into Omeka S, the Team, through which users, resources, and sites are linked. Various components of Omeka S then filter results based on a shared Team, eliminating clutter and reducing the chances of mistakes. Additionally, to address security concerns and provide greater flexibility, a supplemental access control setting allows administrators restrict user permissions on a Team-by-Team basis. This presentation will discuss the UX and operational challenges researchers and publishing staff face when using Omeka S as a long-form publishing platform, and describe how the Teams module can address those concerns.


State-of-the-art, non-commercial library publishing at TIB

Presenters:

  • Xenia van Edig, Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB)
  • Dulip Withanage, Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB)

Description:

With TIB Open Publishing, the Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) – Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology – is about to launch a new open-access service on which scientific journals and conference publications can be published. In doing so, it is underlining its orientation towards open science and adding a significant new pillar to its activities to support the transition to open access. As a research partner, TIB is committed to professional, optimally accessible, and widely visible publications. The service is aimed at editors of scientific journals and conference publications who want a library-supported, non-commercial, but at the same time sophisticated, sustainable, and completely open access publication option. Our service is aimed at existing conference publications and journals as well as at new launches and it is open to all scientific disciplines. The scientists who act as editors and reviewers of the individual publications are responsible for the quality assurance of the content of the published articles. On the part of TIB Open Publishing, however, we ensure that formal quality standards are met by the hosted publications. There must be compatibility with the funding criteria („Plan S“) of the research funding agencies that are members of the cOAlition S. Our quality standards are therefore based on the technical implementation guidelines of Plan S, but also on the DOAJ Seal, the OASPA membership criteria, and the COPE guidelines. Our technical services encompass the hosting of journals and conference publications and the distribution of metadata and content to indexing, archiving, and registration systems. We offer a continuously enhanced XML-based publication workflow and engage especially with the OJS developer community in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. We also develop OJS plugins for community use.


March 19, 2021

Panel Mo1a

Day/Time: Monday, May 10, 1:15 PM to 2:15 PM


Capturing Open Access Publishing Efforts in the International Journal of Librarianship by the Chinese American Librarians Association: A Case Study

Presenters:

  • Raymond Pun, Education/Outreach Manager, Hoover Institution Library & Archives, Stanford University
  • Grace Liu, Systems Librarian, University of Windsor

Description:

In this project update, the presenters will discuss publishing efforts and experiences on the International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL) hosted by the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), a National Association of Librarians of Color (NALoC). Since 2016, IJoL is an open access and refereed journal that focuses on research and discussion in all areas of librarianship and information science globally. Most importantly, the journal centers on global audience and connections and recent issues covered timely topics such as sustainability in libraries and artificial intelligence. This presentation will share the logistical components of setting up the open access publication, the process in quality control and management including benefits and challenges. The presenters include the Chief Editor and a Guest Editor of the journal who will share their experiences in supporting the journal as CALA volunteers and supporting the publication, now reaching its fifth year. The speakers will discuss how the journal serves as an important collaboration to engage with librarians from Asia, particularly in China. Attendees will learn more about this journal platform and its process and be engaged in discussing how libraries and associations can manage and promote and support research in open access publishing.


Poly Publishing: a choose-your-own ideals in publishing

Presenter:

  • jaime ding, California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo

Description:

Poly Publishing is a publishing program that aims to raise visibility and enhance access to Cal Poly scholarship. In working to create an immersive, interactive digital project, this alternative approach to present and disseminate academic scholarship rethinks accessibility and assessment of such work. The system focuses on collaboration, accessible approaches, and recognition of individual’s places within structural systems, using inclusive and equitable practices to adjust scholarly publishing while centering historically underrepresented identities, perspectives, and creativity. Using past projects from the Cal Poly faculty exhibition program as prototypes, the project aims to ensure scholarship will be transformed into digital publications that integrate with current publishing systems on and off campus. By creating a non-traditional pathway for publishing scholarly research, this pilot project plays an active role in strengthening Cal Poly’s scholarly communication system, with a commitment to amplify underrepresented topics and voices.

This presentation will outline the workflow, concepts, and scholarship of the Poly Publishing program. Using an interactive choose-your-own adventure format, each section of the publishing process (content selection, digital development, assessment, and dissemination ideals) will pose a question to allow viewers to follow various paths of how poly publishing will work, leaving room for feedback and further questions. The ideas and models that the system has shaped itself from include autoethnography, open peer review discussion sessions, critical race theory, contextual citation practices, visual annotation practices, establishing common vocabularies, and more, all designed to rethink the systemic inequities that academic publishing holds.


Revising the Library Publishing Curriculum: Values, Progress, and Possibilities

Presenter:

  • Cheryl E. Ball, Wayne State University Libraries

Description:

The Library Publishing Curriculum, released in 2018, includes four modules on Content, Impact, Sustainability, and Policy–each with a set of instructional materials that provide a foundation in scholarly publishing for library units that may be new to various forms of scholarly publishing. Sustainability efforts for this IMLS-funded project included onboarding an editor-in-chief (in 2019) and an editorial board (in 2020), to guide and oversee the continued maintenance of and revisions to the curriculum. Following the editor-in-chief’s curriculum update at LPF 2020, this presentation provides updates from the second year of the sustainability plan for this resource. Key outcomes of this individual presentation include an overview of the work the editorial board has accomplished in the (by then, almost a) year they’ve been advising on the curriculum: a preview of their methodology for making revision suggestions; how those suggestions across the four modules raise questions about the structure and use patterns of the existing curriculum; how those questions indicate framing needs in a revised curriculum; what target audiences the curriculum hits and misses (and how to ameliorate those misses); where equity and inclusion need to be more prominently and explicitly addressed; where global outreach and other non-US library publishing units need better representation; where more kinds of library publishing units including non-academic and single-person shops need inclusion; and what baseline content is still needed to provide foundational instruction on library publishing in accordance with library publishing values and competencies (as indicated on the Library Publishing Coalition’s website). During the presentation Q&A, the editor-in-chief welcomes additional suggestions from the audience for revisions regarding content, values, structure, framing, outreach, etc. And, by LPF, the editorial board will likely have decided upon a strategy for soliciting revisions for the second edition, the process for which we hope to share.


March 19, 2021

Lightning Talks

Day/Time: Thursday, May 13, 12:00 PM to 1:15 PM


Adapting Free Tools to New Digital Publishing Uses

  • Daina Dickman, MA, MLIS, AHIP; Scholarly Communication Librarian, Sacramento State University
  • Mya Dosch, Assistant Professor, Department of Art, Sacramento State University

Lacking adequate staffing and resources, two faculty members in the Library and Art departments were faced with a challenge. How could a multi-faceted student project that included photos, video interviews, and written work be published to a larger audience? Collaboration, communication about priorities and bandwidth during remote instruction, and being open to challenges allowed collaboration on a new project with the possibility that it could serve as a test case for future digital publications. StoryMapJS is a free tool from Knight Lab meant to create a location-based sequential narrative for a series of events. By adapting StoryMapsJS away from the time-based narrative approach we created an online publication highlighting students’ projects. The creative application of StoryMapsJS to a new use is allowing students to create a visually-appealing interactive mural walk of downtown Sacramento, CA. As part of the project students were also taught how to create accessible documents for future inclusion in the institutional repository. While this project used a particular platform, this is presented as a case study in cross-departmental collaboration and creativity using available resources. Even though our regional public university does not have the staffing or resources for a full-fledged digital humanities or publishing program the students are still creating amazing work that deserves to be published to a wider audience. As many institutions face budget cuts, we believe creativity and scalability will be a theme that rings true for many people at a variety of institutions.


Developing a Bilingual OER: Pursuing Student Translations for an Open Physics Textbook

  • Moriana M. Garcia – STEM and Scholarly Communications Librarian, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester
  • Kristen Totleben – Humanities Librarian, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester

Addressing issues of equity and inclusion in library collections has become a vital necessity for academic librarians. Increasing the availability of translations is one of the possible strategies designed to make library materials more accessible to students from underrepresented groups. A few years ago, River Campus Libraries collaborated with a faculty member to publish an OER Physics textbook, later ingested in the LibreTexts platform. In this lightning talk, a STEM and a Humanities librarian will share information about their new project aimed to translate the Physics OER textbook to Spanish by collaborating with Spanish faculty and students through an open pedagogy model. The project will use LibreTexts’ Spanish platform to host the translated content. The expectation is to establish an ongoing collaboration with an advanced Spanish course(s) to translate a few sections at a time as part of their curricular work. This project, because of its specific technical language requirements, could function as a low-stakes trial for students considering a career as scientific translators. As many Spanish students in UR are science majors, this activity could establish a connection between their scientific knowledge and their humanities interests. Given that the translated text will be openly available and CC licensed, the project will give students an opportunity to learn about their rights as creators, reflect on their social responsibility as educated citizens and include the experience on their resumes.


Open Editors

  • Andreas Pacher, TU Wien Bibliothek

‘Editormetrics’ analyse the role of editors of academic journals and their influence on the scientific publication system. However, such analyses often rely on laborious processes of manual data-collection. Using webscraping, the project ‘Open Editors’ tried an alternative approach to collect data on ca. 480.000 editorial positions across ca. 6.000 scholarly journals from 17 scientific publishers through automated scripts (see https://openeditors.ooir.org). This presentation offers preliminary results of descriptive statistics, and discusses possible usages of this open dataset.


Project Open Source Academic Publishing Suite (OS-APS)

  • Markus Putnings, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), University Library / FAU University Press
  • Carsten Borchert, SciFlow GmbH
  • Frederik Eichler, Co-founder, SciFlow GmbH

The Open Source Academic Publishing Suite (OS-APS) project, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, aims to enable small and university publishers to publish very easily and media-neutral. The open source software includes an importer for (e.g. Word) documents and an editor to edit structures and metadata. Using templates, which can either be easily created using an appropriate development kit or selected from a pool of existing ones, the design of the PDF can be automatically adapted according to the format requirements of the publisher. In addition, an EPUB and HTML e-book is created quickly and reliably. SciFlow GmbH develops the Open Source Academic Publishing Suite reusable as open source. The University Library of Erlangen-Nürnberg and the University and State Library Saxony-Anhalt are gathering the requirements of various publishers (e.g. from the working group of German university publishers) and are testing the connection to other open source software such as Open Monograph Press and DSpace. The project team would like to briefly introduce the OS-APS idea and invite further library publishers to participate in the project, for example by joining the OS-APS advisory board (https://os-aps.de/participate/).


Revising the Model Publishing Contract for Open Educational Resources

  • Cheryl E. Ball, Wayne State University Libraries
  • Joshua Neds-Fox, Wayne State University Libraries

With funding from the President’s office, Wayne State University Libraries has begun work to publish our first faculty-authored Open Textbooks. Knowing we needed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with our authors that would directly address 1) the types of content they would be writing and remixing, 2) the Creative Commons license we hoped to apply, and 3) the funding distribution for author stipends and production costs, we turned to Emory University’s and the University of Michigan’s “Model Publishing Contract for Digital Scholarship” (2017), featured at previous LP and DL Forums. This Model Publishing Contract “[articulates] a more liberal approach to author rights,” which aligned nicely with our own aims. However, in practice, we found the contract heavily reliant on traditional commercial publishing values instead of library publishing values, most clearly in its discussion of licensing and royalties. This lightning presentation points out the key changes we needed to make to the Model Publishing Contract to accommodate a fully open, royalty-free, Creative-Commons-licensed, non-commercial textbook, and should prove useful to library publishers in similar scenarios. A version of our revised MOU will be available through the Library Publishing Coalition’s member resources page.


Scholia for increasing IR participation

  • Ashlea Green, Appalachian State University

Academic institutions may face a number of challenges in persuading scholars to contribute content to their institutional repositories (IRs), often resulting in a low rate of scholar participation. As Holzman and Kalikman Lippincott (2019) lament, “despite attempts ranging from cajoling to faculty mandates, even getting 50 per cent of local faculty to deposit their materials has been difficult (p. 387).” In light of this, IR administrators need a variety of tools to bolster scholar participation. Scholia, a scholarly profile visualization service using data from Wikidata, may serve as one such tool. This lightning presentation will provide an overview of Scholia as a means for identifying scholars and their works and for encouraging their participation in institutional repositories through targeted outreach.

Holzman, A., & Kalikman Lippincott, S. (2019). Libraries. In A. Phillips & M. Bhaskar (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Publishing (pp. 379-397). Oxford University Press.


Using the Instructor Guide for Course Journals to support in-class, library-supported student publishing projects

  • Kate Shuttleworth, Simon Fraser University
  • Karen Meijer-Kline, Kwantlen Polytechnic University

At the 2019 PKP Sprint in Barcelona, a team of librarians created an Instructor Guide for Course Journals to help college and university instructors develop in-class academic publishing projects. This lightning talk will introduce the projects that inspired the guide and set the stage for a webinar on the same topic, to be held at a later date.

At SFU and KPU Libraries, we work with course instructors in a variety of subjects to publish course journals: library-hosted journals published as part of for-credit courses in a variety of subject areas. Course journals offer valuable learning opportunities for students by involving them in the publishing process; they are an example of open pedagogy in that they provide an alternative to the “disposable assignment” by encouraging students to publish their work openly as part of the journal. Students learn about open access, copyright, author rights, and Creative Commons licensing, while gaining hands-on experience with peer review and writing for publication.

The webinar will be a chance to start a discussion about how library publishing programs can leverage the Instructor Guide to encourage instructors at their own institutions to create online, open access journals in their for-credit courses.

Interested in learning about course journals and want to know whether the webinar is right for you? Listen to our lighting talk and find out!


Using Web Scraping to Enrich Metadata

  • Joseph Muller, Michigan Publishing

When preparing metadata for a platform or repository, we often want to enrich it: filling in gaps, adding fields, or checking it against authoritative sources. In the case of ACLS Humanities E-Book, a collection of over 5,000 books published mainly by university presses, Michigan Publishing often lacked book descriptions in our own metadata but found them on the original publisher websites. In this lightning talk, I show how I used web scraping—powered with a custom Python script—to automate the collection of book descriptions from various websites, saving hours of manual searching and copy-pasting. Web scraping is a powerful tool for data collection that, when used ethically and at scale, can bring a little magic to otherwise tedious workflows and free us up for the more artful to-dos on our list.


March 19, 2021

Full Session: Context, not checklists! Workshopping a collaborative, context-driven approach to evaluating journals

Day/Time: Friday, May 14, 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM

Presenters

  • Matt Ruen, Grand Valley State University
  • Brianne Selman, University of Winnipeg
  • Stephanie Towery, Texas State University
  • Leila Sterman, Montana State University
  • Joshua Neds-Fox, Wayne State University
  • Teresa Schultz, University of Nevada, Reno

Description

Attendees of this workshop will get the most out of it if they preview the project at https://vimeo.com/543381147

Concerns about “predatory” or questionable journals have led many academics to seek out simple checklists of good or bad journals, but this obscures the contextual and constructed nature of authority in information.

A group of librarians has banded together to try to address this problem through the creation of the journal Reviews: the Journal of Journal Reviews (RJJR) that would invite peer reviewed evaluations of all journals, both open and paywalled, from across the world, no matter the language. The idea is to create an open rubric for thoughtfully evaluating a journal, as well as a platform for sharing those evaluations as resources. Authors interested in a potential journal could look to RJJR for evaluations already completed on the journal, while the reviews themselves would model the practice of nuanced, contextual evaluation. This aims to be an iterative process that can be updated and allows for open feedback.

The values which shape this project include: taking a critical approach to prestige, supporting labor not traditionally seen as scholarly work, ensuring an environment inclusive of diverse voices, being transparent about the process, emphasizing nuance in journal evaluation, and accepting that change happens.

Prior to the Forum, we will share our rubric and a video overview of this project so that the session can focus on deeper engagement with the idea of context-centered journal reviews as a form of scholarly publication.  The heart of this session will be a facilitated conversation using Mentimeter to gather and discuss recommendations, critiques, and other feedback from participants.

We invite participants to help us revise and reflect on our project, specifically considering these questions:

  • For authors, does the context-centric rubric make sense when evaluating an unfamiliar journal, and how can we improve the tool for your future use?
  • For editors, is our framework appropriate to evaluate your journal?
  • For librarians, does this publication structure adequately recognize that the labor of librarians supporting scholarly communications is itself scholarship, especially for promotion and advancement?
  • For everyone, how can the practice of contextual evaluation critically reflect on racial, gender, and global biases that shape perceptions of publication venues?

“Read the Rubric: https://tinyurl.com/rjjrrubric


March 19, 2021

Full Session: Advancing Open Access Book Analytics for Library Publishing: Moving from use cases and case studies to next steps

Day/Time: Friday, May 14, 1:15 PM to 2:15 PM

Presenters

  • Christina Drummond, Data Trust Program Officer, Educopia Institute / OA Ebook Usage Data Trust
  • Lara Speicher, Head of Publishing, UCL Press
  • Charles Watkinson Associate University Librarian for Publishing / Director, University of Michigan Press
  • Andrew Joseph, Digital Publisher, Wits University Press
  • Cameron Neylon, Professor of Research Communication, Centre for Culture and Technology, Curtin University

Description

This session will explore the opportunities and challenges library publishers face when looking to leverage OA book usage data for reporting and operational decision-making. The session will begin with an overview of the data flows, stakeholders, and metadata standards that enable OA book analytics, noting the role of a usage data trust in supporting library publishers’ use cases for OA book usage data. Three representatives will then share their experiences developing and piloting OA ebook usage dashboards to collate and visualize cross-platform usage and impact statistics. Each will share information about their organization’s OA book data dashboards to then describe how the addition of these dashboards has impacted their press operations.

After the case-study presentations, a member of the OA eBook Usage Data Trust’s technical team will provide a brief overview of the infrastructure that enables the cross-platform visualizations and then address the importance of privacy, security, and community governance mechanisms for such a public/private multi-stakeholder effort. The session will conclude with participants being invited to brainstorm needs, concerns, and questions to inform future development of this and other tools for library-publishers.


March 19, 2021

Full Session: Long-Term Preservation of Digital Library Publishing Content

Day/Time: Thursday, May 13, 4:00 PM to 5 PM

Presenters

  • Craig Van Dyck, outgoing Executive Director, CLOCKSS Archive
  • Jasmine Mulliken, Stanford University Press
  • Alicia Wise, incoming Executive Director, CLOCKSS Archive

Description

Library Publishers are aware of the importance of long-term digital presentation. In fact, librarians are the primary champions of preservation. However, many library publishers have not yet established a formal solution for preserving their content, including new forms of content that present preservation challenges.

This session will speak in general terms about digital preservation options that may be appropriate for library publishers. And the session will use Stanford University Press’s digital publishing program as a case study of the challenges faced by academy-led publishing, and how to think about preservation of these new types of interactive scholarly works that include multi-modal, dynamic, user-driven elements. A contributor to Educopia’s 2018 Library Publishing Curriculum, SUP’s digital program has advocated for the inclusion of preservation considerations early in a publication’s development. Their experiences identifying and applying preservation solutions before, during, and after a project’s publication shed light on the real challenges that publishers of complex digital content face.

Each presentation will be 20 minutes, leaving 20 minutes for Q&A. The presentations will include interactive polls to get input from the audience, which can be used to seed the Q&A session.

CLOCKSS is a robust and stable digital preservation system that serves the scholarly community. The CLOCKSS presentation will cover the basics of long-term preservation of digital scholarly content, and will survey the landscape of appropriate preservation options – not only CLOCKSS, but the Public Knowledge Project Preservation Network (PKP PN) and others.

The Stanford University Press presentation will describe the Press’s Mellon-funded digital publishing initiative and the challenges faced, as well as the Press’s experiences as a participant in a follow-on Mellon-funded project that focuses on the preservation of enhanced e-books.

 


March 19, 2021

Full Session: LPC Fellows Forum 2021

Day/Time: Thursday, May 13, 4:00 PM to 5 PM

Presenters

  • Jody Bailey, LPC Board President (2020-2021) and Head of Scholarly Communications Office, Emory University
  • Talea Anderson, LPC Fellow (2019-2021) and Scholarly Communication Librarian, Washington State University
  • A.J. Boston, LPC Fellow (2019-2021) and Scholarly Communication Librarian, Murray State University

Description

In this session, Talea Anderson and A.J. Boston, LPC Fellows for 2019-2021, will reflect on their two-year terms as LPC Fellows and provide an update on their latest research activities related to library publishing. A.J. will discuss three writing projects (including a flip on David Lewis’ 2.5% proposal, a concept for a visual peer-review overlay service, and a potential alternative to the transformative agreement), while Talea will discuss accessibility in library publishing. After these presentations, all attendees will be invited to participate in a discussion of these topics moderated by LPC Board President Jody Bailey.


March 19, 2021

Full Session: Presenting Preprints: Are Library Publishers the New Facebook?

Day/Time: Thursday, May 13, 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM

Presenters

  • Lisa Schiff, Associate Director, Publishing, Archives, and Digitization, California Digital Library, University of California
  • Juan Pablo Alperin, Co-director of the ScholCommLab; Associate Director of Research of the Public Knowledge Project; Assistant Professor in the School of Publishing at Simon Fraser University, Canada
  • Bruce Caron, Co-Founder, EarthArXiv; Founder, New Media Studio and the New Media Research Institute, Santa Barbara
  • Martin Paul Eve, Project Lead for Janeway; Co-Director, Open Library of the Humanities; Project Lead for Janeway; Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London
  • Alex Mendonça, Online Submission & Preprints Coordinator, SciELO Brazil

Description

Preprints are an increasingly important component of the scholarly record and preprint platforms have correspondingly grown in number. Academic communities value preprints for the opportunity to share early findings with peers and receive immediate feedback on not-yet-reviewed works. With the COVID pandemic, a broader audience is turning to preprints, as political leaders, journalists, and the public seek new information about the virus. Complications arise, however, when the unvetted nature of these works is not clearly signaled alongside discussions of their findings. In late 2020, Rick Anderson captured these concerns, highlighting cases where discredited preprints remained available to read, presenting a potential for misinformation. Anderson posited that preprint platform providers, not just editors, should ensure adequate preprint vetting and be willing to retract them.

With the availability of two new open-source preprint platforms–PKP’s Open Preprint Systems (OPS) and Birkback’s Janeway preprint server–library publishers now have familiar, robust infrastructure for entering this space and are a logical home for such services, especially given a strong commitment to a specific research community. But what additional responsibilities must we accept–if any–as publishers of this genre? Should we establish terms for vetting of submissions? Without adequate domain knowledge, how would we enforce, or even audit, such terms? How do we indicate that a specific preprint’s findings have not yet been formally accepted? What about obligations regarding debunked publications? What are the responsibilities of platform providers, publishers, and editors? Should library publishers, as a community of practice, expand on the proposed best practices related to preprint metadata to ensure we are responsible actors in providing access to early research?

Panelists will explore these questions during the session’s first half, and invite attendee participation for the second. Registered attendees will receive an advance survey regarding current/planned preprint publishing, in order to identify additional discussion topics.

 


March 19, 2021

Full Session: Journal Seeks Publisher: How JLSC Imagined, Sought, and Found Its Next Partner

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 12, 4:00 PM to 5 PM

Presenters

  • Jill Cirasella, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Rebekah Kati, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Wendy C. Robertson, University of Iowa
  • David Lewis, Emeritus, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis
  • Daniel Bangert, Digital Repository of Ireland, Royal Irish Academy
  • Harrison W. Inefuku, Iowa State University

Description

The Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication (JLSC) is a peer-reviewed, open access journal with no article processing charges for authors. It has been published by Pacific University Libraries (PUL) since its inception in 2012, with all costs covered by PUL. In April 2020, PUL notified JLSC that it was refocusing its publishing program and would not be able to publish JLSC beyond June 2021.

The news hit hard, but the editorial team and editorial board also saw opportunity. What additional best practices might we be able to adopt? What new technologies or modalities might we be able to embrace? What kind of financial sponsorship program might we develop to sustain the journal for years to come? We created a committee to bring our needs and hopes into focus and develop a request for proposals.

In September 2020, we issued the call for proposals and crossed our fingers. We knew our expectations were high, but we also knew that there exist numerous open access publishers with missions aligned with ours. And, indeed, we received six proposals, including a standout proposal from Iowa State University Digital Press (ISUDP). With excitement, hope, and gratitude, we selected ISUDP as JLSC’s next publisher.

In this presentation, members of JLSC’s editorial team and editorial board will detail our search, from initial panic to ultimate partnership. Additionally, the manager of ISUDP will discuss the decision to submit a proposal and the questions that arose while developing it. Attendees will have ample opportunity to ask the panel about our hopes, fears, priorities, and processes.


March 19, 2021

Full Session: Open Access Outreach Through Black Lives Matter Edit-a-thons: Building a Wikipedia Community of Practice

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 12, 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM

Presenters:

  • Melissa Seelye, J. Paul Leonard Library, San Francisco State University
  • Matt Martin, J. Paul Leonard Library, San Francisco State University
  • Devone Rodrigues, J. Paul Leonard Library, San Francisco State University
  • Toni Panlilio, J. Paul Leonard Library, San Francisco State University

Description:

Awareness of open access continues to increase with the proliferation of mandates and open access options provided by major publishing venues. However, most publishing decisions continue to be driven by concerns about prestige and status. As a result, researchers remain largely unaware of the socio-political dynamics at play in knowledge production and the importance of community-owned alternatives to commercial publishers. This session will demonstrate how the Digital Scholarship Center team of San Francisco State University’s J. Paul Leonard Library has started engaging researchers with these and related issues through Wikipedia edit-a-thons. 

The Library Publishing Forum falls just before the global #1Lib1Ref initiative in May, which will mark the one-year anniversary of the Digital Scholarship Center’s inaugural edit-a-thon. Since that time, the team has launched monthly edit-a-thons that task participants with contributing to Wikipedia articles related to the Black Lives Matter movement or the African diaspora more generally, inspired by the Black Lives Matter WikiProject. Through these events, instructional faculty as well as library faculty and staff have been able to learn how inequities in access to knowledge contribute to and reinforce under-representation and bias in our information resources. They are encouraged to seek out open access sources to add to Wikipedia articles, which affords opportunities to highlight library publishing venues and institutional repositories. 

The session will mirror these events, beginning with an introductory 20-minute presentation on the importance of universal access to knowledge, particularly as it relates to coverage of the Black Lives Matter movement. From there, participants will be given 25 minutes to add an open access citation to a Wikipedia article. No experience with Wikipedia editing is necessary, and facilitators will be present to answer questions as they arise.


March 19, 2021

Full Session: The Power of No: Building a Sustainable Publishing Program

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 12, 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM

Presenters

  • Karen Bjork, Portland State University
  • Johanna Meetz, The Ohio State University

Description

We are passionate about our work, and it can be difficult to say “no.” Each project also has the potential to move our program or initiative forward. However, sometimes saying “no” is the more strategic choice; particularly now that Libraries are facing additional budgetary and staffing constraints due to COVID-19 pandemic.

In this session, the panelists will facilitate a collaborative conversation about how saying “no” can be difficult, and what happens when limited resources (staff or budgetary) mean you can’t say “yes” anymore. We will focus on publishing programs that are ready to make a transition from saying “yes” to all (or most) publishing opportunities to being more selective and saying “no” using a business plan for library publishing as a model (McCready, K.; Molls, E. Developing a Business Plan for a Library Publishing Program. Publications 2018, 6, 42. https://doi.org/10.3390/publications6040042).

As initiatives grow and evolve, it becomes increasingly important to evaluate new projects in the context of ongoing commitments and capacity to take on additional work. Making these kinds of choices allows us to maintain the program’s sustainability.

The session leaders will provide real-life scenarios where they have said “no” to projects, the reasons why, and the consequences (if any) of saying “no.” We have a group discussion around:

  • The pros and cons of different solutions that might allow some flexibility as resources are running low
  • Convincing other stakeholders that saying “no” is necessary
  • Choosing to say “no” when you’d really like to say “yes,” as well as the joy that can be found in saying “no” to something that you’re happy to turn down
  • Overcoming the difficulties of saying “no, we can’t keep working together,” to a longtime partner
  • The challenges of juggling other non-publishing related duties, such as traditional scholarly communication librarianship responsibilities


March 19, 2021

Full Session: Advancing Library Publishing Infrastructure: An Update on the Next Gen Library Publishing (NGLP) project

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 12, 1:15 PM to 2:15 PM

Moderator

  • Catherine Mitchell (CDL)

Presenters

  • Paul Walk (COAR)
  • Katherine Skinner (Educopia)
  • Zach Davis (Cast Iron Coding)
  • Kristen Ratan (Stratos)

Description

Following the “Next Gen Library Publishing (NGLP) Infrastructure” workshop at LP Forum 2020, which focused on community requirements gathering, this session will provide an update on the NGLP project’s substantial progress in the past year and offer attendees another opportunity to engage directly with this effort to develop community-led, values-based, flexible open infrastructure to support the growing publishing and repository needs of the library community.

The project update will focus on the following deliverables:

  • A values & principles framework for the evaluation of vendors and technology partners
  • A new catalog of open source tools and platforms available for scholarly publishing
  • Two ambitious technology development projects to fill gaps and share data between existing open source platforms (Janeway, OJS and DSpace) for more robust, multi-stakeholder library publishing
  • The establishment of mission-aligned service providers to host and manage this open infrastructure for library publishers

Attendees will have the opportunity to participate through polls throughout the presentations. 

 

 


March 19, 2021

Full Session: WordPress Wizardry: Building Publications in WordPress

Day/Time: Tuesday, May 11, 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM

Presenters

  • Laureen Boutang, University of Minnesota Libraries
  • John Barneson, University of Minnesota Libraries
  • Shane Nackerud, University of Minnesota Libraries
  • Emma Molls, University of Minnesota Libraries

Description

University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing creates and maintains WordPress sites for law publications, journals, and scholarly websites. We’ll walk through our process of building a WordPress publication, and how we decide when WordPress is the right tool for the job. We’ll describe the work and tools associated with WordPress: hosting and maintenance, plug-ins and security issues, design and build work, analytics and what additional work is required of the journal’s staff. Using our WordPress-based journals and sites as examples we’ll highlight how different tools and designs have been implemented. 20-30 minutes of the presentation time will be allocated to Q&A from attendees. Our developer will be on the call, so please bring detailed questions, and we can demonstrate portions of the work live as needed.