LPC Blog

The Library Publishing Coalition Blog is used to share news and updates about the LPC and the Library Publishing Forum, to draw attention to items of interest to the community, and to publish informal commentaries by LPC members and friends.

Multi-colored umbrellas on blue sky background
February 13, 2019

Indiana University Bloomington: Educating and onboarding editors with the New Journal Toolkit

By

In February 2019, we are publishing our second series of member profiles. These profiles showcase the wide variety of publishing work happening at member institutions, and celebrate our community’s contributions to the wider publishing landscape. This series will also spotlight resources the profiled institutions have contributed to the Shared Documentation library. Many thanks to the members who volunteered to answer our questions! See all of the published profiles, and look for a new one each week in February. 

This post was written by Sarah Hare and Jenny Hoops

To learn more about their program, check out Indiana University’s latest Library Publishing Directory entry.

Tell us a bit about your publishing program.

Indiana University Bloomington has been publishing journals using the Public Knowledge Project’s Open Journal Systems platform since 2008. The Office of Scholarly Publishing, a strategic partnership between IU Press and IU Libraries Scholarly Communication Department to support publishing at IU broadly, was created in 2012. The program centers on access: journals only need an Indiana University affiliation to participate in the library publishing program. 50 journals currently participate in the publishing program in some capacity. This includes formally peer-reviewed faculty publications, student journals, informal serials like newsletters, active journals, and journals that are no longer active but have an extensive, open access back list. Journals receive hosting and operational publishing services at no cost, with the exception of more resource-intensive services like copyediting and print on demand.

IU Libraries’ journal publishing program is part of a larger suite of services centered on “open scholarship” and ensuring that all IU affiliates can make their scholarly outputs–including journal articles, book chapters, media, data, and learning objects–open, regardless of the level of openness they are interested in. Other services the library provides include data management planning, assistance finding and creating OER, repository deposit, and consultation on demonstrating impact. These services contribute to the journal publishing program, giving IU affiliates a comprehensive support structure for engaging with openness.

Tell us something you have accomplished with your program that you’re proud of – big or small.

We have reached a major milestone of 50 total journal publications. While our journals were initially focused on folklore, history, and education, we now host journals on university administration, public affairs, optometry, art, and several other subjects, with journals published by faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students across several schools and departments. We take pride in making our legacy journals with comprehensive backlists more discoverable. For example, recently we have been providing metadata clean up and article-level discoverability, ensuring open access back lists are appearing in searches.

Our program also completed a major platform upgrade last year, updating our instance of Open Journal Systems from 2 to 3. OJS 3 provides our editors with an enhanced, user-friendly interface and customizable editorial workflows. We’ve worked with our editors to help them adapt to the new system and take advantage of the new features while providing support for journal indexing and website design. As we continue to onboard new journals, we hope to publish and support innovative scholarship for a diverse set of editors and disciplines.

Looking ahead, what are you excited about, or what’s on the horizon for your program?

For Open Access Week 2018, we held a workshop on starting an open access journal with IU Libraries. We also interviewed editors of journals we currently publish and our new Open Scholarship Resident, Willa Liburd Tavernier, to learn more about their passion for open access. We hope to continue to use these materials when promoting the program but we are also excited to start to promote our program more systematically. We’re currently working with marketing and communications experts within the Libraries to create more promotional and informational material about our journal publishing program. Right now, editors learn about our program by word of mouth or by interacting with our team through another service. More systematic promotion will enable us to reach IU affiliates that are unaware of our program and are interested in creating or “flipping” a journal to open access.

Photo of seven library staff members at Indiana University Bloomington
Pictured from left to right: Willa Liburd Tavernier, Richard Higgins, Jamie Wittenberg, Jenny Hoops, Sarah Hare (top row), Allison Nolan, and Brian Watson (bottom row)

 

(more…)


February 11, 2019

LPC Board elections: Candidate bios and statements

By

Elections for the Library Publishing Coalition Board open today and will continue through Friday, March 1st. Instructions for voting will be sent to each member institution’s voting representative. The candidates are:

  • Jennifer Beamer, The Claremont Colleges Library
  • Karen Bjork, Portland State University
  • Christine Fruin, American Theological Library Association
  • Sarah Hare, Indiana University
  • Annie Johnson, Temple University
  • Mark Konecny, University of Cincinnati

Each candidate has provided a brief biography and an election statement:

(more…)


Water with the word reflections in all caps with a horizontal line above and below
February 6, 2019

Academy-owned? Academic-led? Community-led? What’s at stake in the words we use to describe new publishing paradigms

By

Editor’s note: This blog post is LPC’s official contribution to Academic Led Publishing Day (ALPD), a global digital event to foster discussions about how members of the scholarly community can develop and support academic-led publishing initiatives. LPC is participating in ALPD because it presents an opportunity to have a multi-stakeholder discussion about an issue of growing importance to libraries, and to call attention to the lack of a shared vision in this critical area. Our goals in this post are to highlight some of the unresolved questions in this space and to call on libraries to grapple with them.

This post was co-authored by Melanie Schlosser (LPC Community Facilitator) and Catherine Mitchell (Director, Publishing & Special Collections, California Digital Library; Past President of the LPC Board).

***

There is no question that we are facing significant challenges and opportunities as the traditional publishing model begins to falter. How the academy positions itself at this moment will have consequences for years to come.

***

“Academy-owned” seems to be the descriptor du jour in scholarly communications circles.  We talk increasingly about academy-owned infrastructure, academy-owned publishing, academy-owned publications, etc. We find ourselves at meetings and conferences where we explore the challenges of supporting new forms of scholarly research, new modes of publication, new communities of readers — and there it is again — “academy-owned,” lurking in the conversation. We write grants whose very premise is that the academy will rise to claim its rightful place as the source, the maker, the distributor, the curator of its greatest asset — knowledge. There is definitely a movement afoot.

Why has this phrase taken hold lately? The landscape is increasingly dominated by large, multinational corporations that are vacuuming up tools and platforms throughout the scholarly communication lifecycle. Although many of these corporations are familiar to libraries as content publishers, they are expanding their reach well beyond publishing to control both upstream and downstream activities: pre-print servers, OA publishing platforms, current research information systems, etc. A rebellion is stirring among those who worry that we are increasingly abdicating control of the academy’s intellectual property, its data, its ability to share information — even its values — to for-profit companies. The more we rely on licensed resources to read, distribute, and measure the impact of our research — as well as to determine the success of our researchers and the value of our institutions — the more in thrall the academy is to a set of values that are derived from a profit-driven marketplace founded on restricted access to information and abstract performance metrics.

And yet this noble impulse to claim a space for the academy in the exchange and evaluation of scholarly research is also rife with linguistic confusion. While the drive toward “academy-owned” solutions is pervasive, the language we use to articulate this drive lacks precision. Sometimes we talk about “academy-owned” projects, but just as often we describe them as “academic-led” or “community-led” or any number of other permutations. [1] These phrases are not synonymous — their distinctions are actually quite important — yet we use them interchangeably and nod to each other, as if we know what we mean. What, exactly, do we mean? It’s time to ask ourselves to identify the big issues and difficult questions embedded both in the terms themselves and the vagueness with which we use them.

(more…)


Multi-colored umbrellas on blue sky background
February 6, 2019

UNC Charlotte: Resourceful staffing, strategic publishing

By

In February 2019, we are publishing our second series of member profiles. These profiles showcase the wide variety of publishing work happening at member institutions, and celebrate our community’s contributions to the wider publishing landscape. This series will also spotlight resources the profiled institutions have contributed to the Shared Documentation library. Many thanks to the members who volunteered to answer our questions! See all of the published profiles, and look for a new one each week in February. 

To learn more about their program, check out UNC Charlotte’s latest Library Publishing Directory entry.

Tell us a bit about your publishing program.

The J. Murrey Atkins Library Digital Publishing Services was established in 2012 as part of the then Digital Scholarship Lab. The service currently resides within Technology and Digital Strategies and is staffed by two full-time employees. The two positions that report directly include the Head of Library Technology and Innovation and the Special Collections and Digital Projects Assistant. In addition, the library draws upon the expertise of the Copyright and Licensing Librarian and Graphic and UX Designer for guidance and technical assistance. The mission of Library Digital Publishing is to support the publication of scholarly works, including online journals, ebooks, digital exhibits, and conference proceedings for researchers and faculty at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. The services are built on robust publishing platforms that promote open knowledge exchange, wide scholarship discoverability, and innovative dissemination of scholarly communication. We utilize Open Journal Systems, Open Monograph Press, Open Conference Systems, and Omeka to support open access publishing for the campus. Since its inception, Atkins Library Digital Publishing Services has published five open access journals, five ebook titles, one conference, and four Omeka exhibits. All of our publications are sponsored by a faculty editor and are available freely online. The library provides the mechanism to launch new OA titles and the infrastructure for long-term access and preservation. In summation, we offer technical support, platform-specific software training, graphic design assistance, and one-on-one consultations to increase awareness and adoption of open access publishing.

Photo of four staff members at University of North Carolina Charlotte library

From left to right: Christin Lampkowski (Special Collections and Digital Projects Assistant), Somaly Kim Wu (Head of Library Technology & Innovation) with Special Collections and University Archives staff, Rita Johnston (Digital Production Librarian) and Olivia Eanes (Reading Room & Archives Assistant) at the book talk for Miss Bonnie’s Nurses.

(more…)


January 24, 2019

Article on LPC published in Library Trends

By

There’s an article about the Library Publishing Coalition in the Fall 2018 issue of Library Trends! If you’re not familiar with it, Library Trends is a quarterly journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press. Each issue is guest-edited and focused on a single theme. This issue’s editor is Lewis G. Liu (City University of New York), and its theme is “The Role and Impact of Commercial and Noncommercial Publishers in Scholarly Publishing on Academic Libraries.” Dr. Liu reached out to me in late 2017 and invited a contribution to the issue on the LPC. The resulting article, “Building Capacity for Academy-Owned Publishing through the Library Publishing Coalition,” explores the history, current activities, and future directions for the LPC.

A note about rights: Library Trends is a subscription journal that asks for a full copyright transfer from its authors. While LPC’s Board and I were excited about this opportunity to share the work we are doing with a broader audience, openness is a central value of the LPC community, and we were not comfortable contributing to a journal under these terms. With the support of the Board, I asked for and received an alternative author agreement that allowed me to retain copyright ownership of the article (the issue-level copyright statement on the PDF notwithstanding) and share it openly.

With thanks to Dr. Liu for the invitation, the Library Trends staff for their flexibility, and LPC’s Board for their support and suggestions on the manuscript, here is the final article!

  • Citation: Schlosser, M. (2018).  Building Capacity for Academy-Owned Publishing through the Library Publishing Coalition. Library Trends, 67(2), 359-375.

Read the Article (PDF)

 

The issue also includes two other articles related to library publishing, one of which is written by a number of LPC community members!

  • Li, Y., Lippincott, S., Hare, S., Wittenberg, J., Preate, S., Page, A., & Guiod, S. The Library-Press Partnership: An Overview and Two Case Studies. 319-336.
  • Moulaison, H., & Bially Mattern, J. Academic Library-Based Publishing: A State of the Evolving Art. 337-358.


January 14, 2019

Registration open for last two Library Publishing Curriculum pilot workshops

By

The Educopia Institute and the Library Publishing Coalition are pleased to open registration for the last set of pilot workshops for the IMLS-funded  Developing A Curriculum to Advance Library-Based Publishing project, based on the Policy Module. For our last two workshops, we are piloting two entirely new formats: an asynchronous virtual workshop and an in-person “Policy Lab.” Both workshops will be taught by Library Publishing Curriculum project leads Melanie Schlosser (Library Publishing Coalition Community Facilitator) and Katherine Skinner (Executive Director, Educopia Institute).  The workshops have been designed as a series, and participants are encouraged to take both if they are able.  

Library Publishing Curriculum: Policy Virtual Workshop

In March, we will hold a completely asynchronous, 4-week virtual workshop based on the four units of the Policy Module. Each week, participants will watch a recorded lecture, explore a reading or other related resource, and participate in a discussion on Slack. The virtual workshop will provide an opportunity for participants to explore topics in depth and to build a foundation for policy development at their institution.

Registration is free but attendance is capped at 40 participants. Our previous virtual workshops have filled up within days, so register as soon as possible!

Register for the virtual workshop

Library Publishing Curriculum: Policy Lab

On May 7 (the day before the 2019 Library Publishing Forum), library publishers will have the opportunity to participate in a “Policy Lab” workshop. The day will be focused on discussion and hands-on activities, and each participant will leave with two draft policies for their library publishing program, related to copyright, legal agreements, diversity, or preservation. To help participants get the most out of the lab, they will be given access to the recorded lectures from the virtual workshop ahead of time. The workshop will be held at Simon Fraser University’s Harbour Centre campus in Vancouver, BC.

Registration is US$75 for the full-day workshop (including breakfast, lunch, and coffee breaks) and participation is capped at 20 attendees.

Register for the Policy Lab

About the Policy Module

The Policy Module of the Library Publishing Curriculum covers how library publishers develop policies that guide specific areas of their work. Its initial release was focused on policies related to copyright, diversity, and digital preservation, and guidance on creating legal agreements.

Authors: Sara Benson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Harriet Green (Washington University St. Louis), Merinda Hensley (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Janet Swatscheno (University of Illinois Chicago), Melanie Schlosser (Educopia Institute), Katherine Skinner (Educopia Institute)


Promo image for 2019 Forum
January 14, 2019

Apply for the Library Publishing Forum Award

By

LPC is delighted to once again offer travel scholarships for first-time attendees. For 2019, we have increased both the number and amount of the awards: three awards of $1,200 each plus conference registration. The Library Publishing Forum Award is part of our efforts to increase the diversity and inclusiveness of our community and to promote the broadest possible participation at the Library Publishing Forum. The application deadline is Sunday, February 3rd, so get your applications in!

Learn more and apply


Promo image for 2019 Forum
January 14, 2019

It’s time to register for the Library Publishing Forum!

By

Registration is now open for the Library Publishing Forum and for Opening the Classroom: Publishing Open Educational Resources (preconference).

Library Publishing Forum registration (May 9-10)

More information about registration, including rates and refund policies, can be found on the Registration and Travel page. The registration deadline is April 19th.

Register for the Forum

Preconference registration (May 8)

Don’t miss out on this year’s preconference, Opening the Classroom: Publishing Open Educational Resources, co-sponsored by the Open Textbook Network and BCcampus. You can register for the whole day, or choose to attend just the morning textbook publishing workshop or the afternoon mini-conference. Space is limited for this one (especially the workshop, which is limited to 50 participants), so make sure to register early!

Register for the Preconference

 


LPC logo, quarterly update, image of pen and envelopes
January 10, 2019

LPC Quarterly Update

By

Check out our latest Quarterly Update! It includes:

  • New members and a new strategic affiliate
  • Winner of the first annual LPC Award for Exemplary Service
  • Call for nominations for our annual research award
  • LPC/Open Textbook Network webinar exchange
  • Library Publishing Forum
    • Registration coming soon
    • Schedule at-a-glance
    • Travel information
  • Featured resource: New updates to the Library Publishing Bibliography


January 9, 2019

Matt Ruen receives the first annual LPC Award for Exemplary Service

By

As participation in library publishing grows, community involvement and leadership has become increasingly important for the profession. To this end, the LPC Board established the LPC Award for Exemplary Service, recognizing substantial contributions by an LPC community member to advancing the mission, vision, and values of the Library Publishing Coalition.

Whimsical headshot of Matt in front of a buildingOn behalf of the LPC Board, we are delighted to announce that the recipient of the 2018 LPC Award for Exemplary Service is Matt Ruen (Grand Valley State University). Matt is being recognized for his dedicated service on the LPC Program Committee, and was praised by committee members as an “excellent listener who leads the group gently toward programmatic, thoughtful action.” In his second consecutive term as committee chair, Matt has guided the Program Committee during a time when the Library Publishing Forum has grown significantly, and has helped to create effective structures for program planning and handling an increasing volume of proposals.

In addition to his work on the Program Committee, Matt served as an instructor for a Library Publishing Curriculum workshop at this year’s Digital Library Federation Forum, educating other librarians about best practices and standards in library publishing.

Matt will receive a complimentary registration to this year’s Library Publishing Forum, a $50 gift card, and he will be recognized at the Forum.


January 9, 2019

January is Shared Documentation Month for the LPC

By

One of LPC’s most important member resources is the Shared Documentation portal, which allows members to build on each other’s work by sharing policies, procedures, MOUs, position descriptions, and other internal documentation that’s produced by library publishing organizations. To increase awareness and facilitate use of the shared documentation, this January will be our first-ever Shared Documentation Month! If you’re at a member institution, keep an eye on the list each Wednesday this month for a message where we highlight a shared document and provide tools and resources to support use of the Shared Documentation.

Not at a member institution? Consider LPC membership for your library!

LPC Publishers & Service Providers


January 9, 2019

LPC welcomes a new strategic affiliate: Creative Commons USA

By

Creative Commons USA logo

The Library Publishing Coalition is delighted to welcome Creative Commons USA (CC USA) as a new strategic affiliate! A statement from CC USA:

“Creative Commons USA is excited to announce that we have become a Strategic Affiliate of the Library Publishing Coalition. LPC is doing great work coordinating key stakeholders in the publishing of educational and scholarly works – and we hope our partnership will support their goal of creating a more open publishing ecosystem. As stewards of one of the most common open licenses, Creative Commons USA is committed to providing expert support and professional development opportunities around copyright and licensing.”

And a statement from LPC on the new relationship:

“Open licensing is an important tool for library publishers as they look to increase the reach and impact of the scholarship they publish. Creative Commons USA has already been a valuable partner for the Library Publishing Coalition as we support the community in this work, and our members continue to benefit from CC USA’s deep expertise on copyright and licensing. We look forward to deepening our partnership around professional development and to advancing our shared values.”

Strategic affiliates are peer membership associations who have a focal area in scholarly communications and substantial engagement with libraries, publishers, or both. See our list of strategic affiliates or learn more about the program.

LPC Strategic Affiliates icon


Promo image for 2019 Forum
January 8, 2019

Announcing the 2019 Library Publishing Forum keynote speaker: Dr. Arianna Becerril-García

By

The Library Publishing Coalition Program Committee is delighted to announce that the 2019 Library Publishing Forum keynote address will be presented by Dr. Arianna Becerril-García, co-founder and Executive Director of Redalyc (the Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal).  

Photo of Dr. Arianna Becerril-GarciaIn addition to Redalyc, Dr. Becerril-García co-founded the Mexican Network of Institutional Repositories (REMERI), and founded AmeliCA, a community-driven initiative for Open Knowledge in Latin America and the Global South. As a professor at the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico, her research areas include open access, interoperability, linked data, and the semantic web.  Recent works include The End of a Centralized Open Access Project and the Beginning of a Community-Based Sustainable Infrastructure for Latin America: Redalyc.org after Fifteen Years The Open Access ecosystem in Latin America, and A Semantic Model for Selective Knowledge Discovery over OAI-PMH Structured Resources.

We are particularly excited to learn from Dr. Becerril-García’s expertise and experience building successful, sustainable, community-based scholarly publishing.

Redlayc and other Latin American initiatives are leaders in this area, and their successes and challenges are highly relevant for ongoing U.S. and Canadian discussions about academy owned infrastructure (like last year’s Owned by the Academy preconference).  


Registration for the Library Publishing Forum will open on January 14, 2019. Travel and hotel information is currently available.


January 3, 2019

LPC is hiring!

By

To support our growing community of members and expanding roster of projects and programs, LPC is hiring our first-ever Program Assistant.

This 20 hr/wk position will provide support for administration, communications, event planning, research, and more. As an affiliated community of the Educopia Institute, LPC’s staff are employed by Educopia, and work remotely as part of Educopia’s virtual office. If you have strong administrative and communication skills, love library publishing, and are interested in supporting this amazing community, this may be the job for you!  The position is open until filled, but priority will be given to applications received by January 25th.

Check out the full job posting.


December 19, 2018

CFP open for IFLA midterm meeting on library publishing

By

Library publishers around the world (but especially in western Europe), check out this call for proposals! The new IFLA Special Interest Group (SIG) on Library Publishing is sponsoring a mid-term event in Dublin, Ireland in February, hosted by LPC member Dublin Business School. Please note that proposals are due by January 15th!

International Federation of Library Associations logo

IFLA Special Interest Group (SIG) on Library Publishing
2019 Midterm Meeting

Thursday February 28th – Friday March 1st 2019
Dublin Business School, Dublin, Ireland

Call for Participation

THEME:  Mentoring and Education for Excellence in Library Publishing: An International Knowledge Exchange

Aim

Library publishing (including new-model university presses housed in libraries) is in its infancy in many countries around the world.  The IFLA SIG aims to bring together experienced practitioners and would-be publishers to share information and advance this exciting field of endeavor. New and emerging library publishers will gain insight into the experiences and practices of established presses, and all attendees will learn from new and innovative approaches. The presentations from both sides and the ensuing discussions will advance the excellence and sustainability of library publishing ventures

The aim of the event is to bring together a broad spectrum of publishing programs, to exchange knowledge, and to foster networks and mentoring relationships among library publishers at all stages, also highlighting the important role that the Library Publishing Coalition plays in this regard.

The SIG meeting also invites participation by library schools and others engaged in efforts to educate the next generation of library publishers.  (more…)


December 13, 2018

LPC/Open Textbook Network webinar exchange

By

To lead into our joint preconference to the Library Publishing Forum (Opening the Classroom: Publishing Open Educational Resources, 5/8/19), the Library Publishing Coalition and the Open Textbook Network are organizing a webinar “exchange”! LPC is hosting a webinar for its members on the OTN’s Publishing Cooperative, and OTN is holding a series of three webinars for its membership on OER publishing from a strategic perspective. As part of the exchange, members of both communities are invited to attend all four webinars!

LPC webinar

Figuring it out together: Building foundational knowledge for OER publishing

Date: February 6th, 2pm Eastern/11am Pacific
Presenters: Karen Lauritsen, managing director, Open Textbook Network; Karen Bjork, head of digital initiatives at Portland State University; Carla Myers, assistant librarian and coordinator of scholarly communications for the Miami University Libraries

Details

OTN webinar series: Building an open textbook publishing program

Should you publish?

Date: January 23rd, 2pm Eastern/11am Pacific
Presenter: John W. Warren, George Washington University

How should you publish?

Date: February 20th, 3pm Eastern/12pm Pacific
Presenter: Kevin Hawkins, University of North Texas

Implementing a publishing program

Date: March 14th, 2pm Eastern/11am Pacific
Presenter: Inba Kehoe, University of Victoria

Details


Title text and image of a sparkler in a forest
December 12, 2018

Nominations are open for the 2019 research award!

By

‘Tis the season…to nominate yourself or a colleague for the 2019 LPC Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Library Publishing! LPC’s Research Committee is accepting nominations for the award until January 25th. Nominated publications must present original research, theory, or practice, and must have been published during the 2018 calendar year. One change for this year: the committee has broadened the definition of “scholarship” used for the program to include transformative work that isn’t published in a traditional, peer-reviewed format. Learn more and nominate a publication!

Call for Nominations


Water with the word reflections in all caps with a horizontal line above and below
November 29, 2018

The state of the field: An excerpt from the 2019 Library Publishing Directory

By

As much as we love the searchable online interface for the Library Publishing Directory, it doesn’t include the introduction found in the print, PDF, and EPUB versions. Each year, the Directory‘s introduction includes a ‘state of the field’ based on that year’s data that highlights trends and new developments in library publishing as reported by the programs that contribute their information. To make it easier to find, we are republishing that portion of the introduction here. This year’s introduction was written by Alexandra Hoff, Jessica Kirschner, Janet Swatscheno, and Robert Browder, with an assist from me. Enjoy!

MOVING FORWARD, LOOKING OUTWARD

LOCAL AND EXTERNAL PARTNERSHIPS

Local partnerships remain a mainstay of library publishing, and this is reflected in the 2019 dataset. Most library publishers report partnering with campus departments (80%) and individual faculty (78%). Many also partner with
graduate students (57%) and undergraduate students (57%). A minority of library publishers partner with the university press (29%).

While library publishers continue to focus on campus stakeholders through faculty-driven and student-driven journals, this year’s responses indicated a significant increase in the number of journals published for external groups. The number of faculty-driven journals increased 16% (442 to 512) from the previous year, and the number of student-driven journals increased 31% (224 to 294), while journals published for external groups increased 50% (173 to 259). It is possible that the increase in journals published for outside groups is part of a larger trend in library publishing, or it may reflect more specifically the publishing approaches of the many new entries in this year’s Directory. (more…)


Library Publishing Directory 2019 now available
November 29, 2018

Now available: This year’s Library Publishing Directory

By

The Library Publishing Coalition is pleased to announce publication of the 2019 Library Publishing Directory! This year’s Library Publishing Directory highlights the publishing activities of 138 academic and research libraries, and is openly available in PDF and EPUB formats and via the searchable online directory. The Directory illustrates the many ways in which libraries are actively transforming and advancing scholarly communications in partnership with scholars, students, university presses, and others. Each year, the Directory‘s introduction presents a ‘state of the field’ based on that year’s data. 

Publication of the 2019 Directory was overseen by the LPC’s Directory Committee:

  • Alexandra Hoff, Purdue University (2018-19 chair)
  • Robert Browder, Virginia Tech
  • Janet Swatscheno, University of Illinois
  • Jessica Kirschner, Texas Tech
  • Melanie Schlosser, Educopia Institute (ex officio)

The Directory is made possible by the generous donation of services from Purdue University Libraries and Bookmasters.