LPC Blog

The Library Publishing Coalition Blog is used to share news and updates about the LPC and the Library Publishing Forum, to draw attention to items of interest to the community, and to publish informal commentaries by LPC members and friends.

June 11, 2018

Library Publishing Curriculum: Register for the Sustainability Virtual Workshop

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Colorful books with gray overlay and text that reads: "Library publishing curriculum. Virtual workshop. Sustainability module. July 9-30, 2018. Taught by Holly Mercer, Associate Dean for Research, Collections, and Scholarly Communications, University of Tennessee, Knoxville." Educopia Institute, Library Publishing Coalition, and IMLS logos included.

The Library Publishing Coalition and the Educopia Institute are excited to host a series of virtual pilot workshops based on the IMLS-funded Developing a Curriculum to Advance Library-Based Publishing project. Our first virtual workshop – Library Publishing Curriculum: Sustainability – will begin on July 9, 2018 and will last four weeks, ending on July 30. The workshop is limited to 30 participants, and registration is first come, first served. There is no registration fee.  

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June 11, 2018

Challenges and opportunities (but mostly opportunities) for open source infrastructure in library publishing

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Editor’s note: This is part of a series of reflections by community members on the recent Library Publishing Forum. See the whole series. This post is guest written by Alison McGonagle-O’Connell, Editoria Community Manager and Owned by the Academy presenter. 

As a first-time Library Publishing Forum attendee, presenter, and a participant in the “Owned by the Academy” pre-meeting, I was struck by how truly welcoming and collaborative this group is! These meetings also provided me with a few key takeaways:

  1. Open Source (OS) publishing technologies are proliferating, and are of increasing interest to the broader library publishing community.
  2. These tools and platforms represent one way for the community to reclaim some control of the scholarly communication marketplace.
  3. Hosted service models for OS tools will be necessary for some to take the leap from commercial products.
  4. OS providers need to work together to ensure interoperability, and to effectively map tool capabilities to the unique needs and requirements of the community

The first two takeaways are general observations, largely supported by those who attended, tweeted, and have subsequently discussed the meetings openly. OS technology gives organizations the ability to design and customize platforms to support their own needs and values. There is significant freedom in not being locked in to a commercial solution’s unalterable roadmap. Want to design accessibility into the platform with your user community? Go ahead! Concerned about security? Need support for interactive images including integration with data sets? Want to support multiple languages? Done. Nothing is off the table with this kind of community-driven and -supported infrastructure. (more…)


June 8, 2018

From services to access: Reflections of a first-time Forum attendee

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Editor’s note: This is part of a series of reflections by community members on the recent Library Publishing Forum. See the whole series. This post is guest written by Talea Anderson, Scholarly Communication Librarian at Washington State University and recipient of a Library Publishing Forum First-Time Attendee Scholarship. 

In May I attended my first Library Publishing Forum with support kindly provided by LPC. The conference was filled with meaningful experiences for me. I’d mention in particular the time I was able to spend with the editorial staff of Kairos as part of KairosCamp and the opportunity I had later in the week to participate in the first pilot of the Library Publishing Curriculum. I manage a small, service-focused scholarly communication program at Washington State University, and these two workshops provided a glimpse of the editorial services that help keep journals running. On my campus, we are currently moving forward with supporting faculty who would like to create and publish open educational resources and I came away with a better understanding of the kinds of needs these faculty members may have when it comes to preparing, editing, and publishing their work.

These workshops were a great introduction to editorial work and publishing services, but for me the most meaningful part of LPF came on the first day when Catherine Kudlick spoke about web accessibility (slides coming soon). Kudlick invited us as library publishers to build accessibility into our workflows from the start, and to see this work not as punitive but as a service to all people, including disabled communities. This message is certainly important but I connected to it on an unexpectedly personal level. I learned, on introducing myself to Kudlick after her keynote, that we share the same eye condition and face similar challenges when it comes to doing things like presenting to audiences and reading texts on mobile devices. I rarely encounter others who can relate to the way I see—it’s rarer still to find people in academia who cope with vision loss while engaging with publishing and scholarly communication. The brief chat I had with Kudlick was, to say the least, a special opportunity for me. In the end, thanks in part to this encounter, I came away from LPF feeling inspired to continue improving access to information for everyone, including people like me and Kudlick and many others who benefit from inclusive publishing practices.

Talea Anderson
Scholarly Communication Librarian
Washington State University


June 7, 2018

Library publishing services visualized

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Have you ever asked yourself, “What do library publishers actually DO, and can I see it represented in the form of a word cloud?” If so, you’re in luck! I was mucking around with data from the 2018 Library Publishing Directory in support of a project the Professional Development Committee is working on when it occurred to me that it would make a great word cloud. Just for fun, here is a visual representation of more than 100 libraries’ answers to the question, “Which of these additional services does your library offer in support of library publishing activities?”

created at TagCrowd.com


June 7, 2018

What do we value in academic ownership?

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Editor’s note: This is part of a series of reflections by community members on the recent Library Publishing Forum and Owned by the Academy: A Preconference on Open Source Publishing Software. See the whole series

When I learned that this year’s Library Publishing Forum preconference was called “Owned by the Academy,” I knew right away that I had to attend. I was just beginning my new job as Scholarly Communications Librarian at West Virginia University, and our Dean had recently mentioned to me the idea of academically-owned publishing. So the preconference presented a perfect opportunity to learn more about an area of interest at my new institution.

I anticipated that I would learn about lots of different open source publishing platforms, and leave the conference better informed to make recommendations as to which of these would be a good fit for my library, and this certainly happened. But since returning from Minneapolis, I’ve also been spending a lot of time reflecting on owned by the academy as a concept, and so I’m going to dedicate this post to sharing some of my thoughts on this issue.

Prior to the preconference, the phrase owned by the academy brought to my mind open source publishing software built and supported by a community of academic librarians, IT and development staff, and academically-oriented non-profits. I imagined that under an “academically-owned” setup, the software and infrastructure would be hosted at the institutional or consortial level and that commercial entities would not have a role to play.

But in light of my experience at the Owned by the Academy Preconference (and the Library Publishing Forum as a whole), I’ve been reconsidering what owned by the academy really means. At the preconference, there were representatives from colleges, universities, and non-profits, but some for-profit businesses were represented as well. So I’ve been thinking a lot about whether for-profit involvement is compatible with academic ownership. (more…)


May 16, 2018

Watch the livestream of the Library Publishing Forum

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For the second time, we will be livestreaming portions of the Library Publishing Forum (5/22-23)! You can see which sessions will be streamed on the Program Page (look for the little camera icon next to the presentation title). All streaming will be done via LPC’s Twitter account and will be shared via the conference hastag: #LPForum18. Can’t watch the stream live? Links to the recordings will be added to the program after the conference.

A BIG “thank you” to our Forum livestreaming volunteers: Lauren Collister (University of Pittsburgh), Sean Crowe (University of Cincinnati), Kevin Hawkins (University of North Texas), and Jody Bailey (University of Texas at Arlington). We couldn’t do it without you!

We will also be streaming the plenary sessions at Owned by the Academy: A Preconference on Open Source Publishing Software, so make sure to tune in on 5/21 starting at 8:30am CDT. Access to the livestream of the preconference will be via LPC’s Twitter account and the preconference hashtag: #OwnedByTheAcademy.


May 10, 2018

Announcing two new LPC sponsors: ProjectMUSE and BiblioBoard

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We are excited to announce two new organization-level sponsorships through our Publishers and Service Providers Program: Project MUSE and BiblioBoard. We sincerely appreciate their support!

Statement from Project MUSE:

Project MUSE was born from a collaboration between the Johns Hopkins University Press and the Milton S. Eisenhower Library of the Johns Hopkins Sheridan Libraries. We are delighted to continue our involvement with the library community by supporting the Library Publishing Coalition. Project MUSE provides a full-service journal and book hosting platform. Libraries can publish open access journals and books on MUSE or use our fulfillment services to offer subscription-based journals. Content on MUSE benefits from synergies with our corpus of 600+ journals and 50,000+ books from non-profit publishers.

Project MUSE logo

Statement from BiblioBoard:

BiblioBoard is a leader in OER and OA content creation, curation and distribution software. Our platform transforms access to information by delivering a simple, intuitive user experience along with the best content creation tools. We work with public and academic institutions of all sizes to democratize access to information and lower costs for students.

BiblioBoard logo


May 9, 2018

UCL Press: Open access with a global reach

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Multi-colored umbrellas on blue sky background

As we gear up for the Library Publishing Forum and the start of a new membership year in July, we are publishing a series of member profiles. These profiles will showcase the wide variety of publishing work happening at member institutions, and celebrate our community’s contributions to the wider publishing landscape. Many thanks to the members who agreed to answer our questions! See all of the published profiles, and look for a new one each week until the Forum. 

To learn more about their program, check out UCL’s latest Library Publishing Directory entry.

Tell us a bit about your publishing program.

UCL Press (University College London) launched in June 2015 as the first fully open access university press in the UK. It publishes scholarly monographs, textbooks and journals by both UCL and non-UCL authors and all our books and journals are made freely available to download, as well as being sold in print. Since launching, we’ve published 70 books and 8 journals. We have built particular strengths in publishing books on architecture and built environment, anthropology (including a very successful series on social media usage in different parts of the world), archaeology, history, education and sustainability. These subjects reflect some of the great strengths in UCL’s social sciences and humanities departments, with several ranked in the top 10 in the world, for example the UCL Institute of Education, the Bartlett School of Architecture and the Institute of Archaeology. We now publish around 35 books a year and aim to increase to around 40 or 45 next year.

Tell us something you have accomplished with your program that you’re proud of – big or small.

I am particularly proud that we have established a press that is a high-quality scholarly press in its own right and that attracts authors both from UCL and from all around the world. Many of our authors are motivated by our open access policy, but they also seek high-quality publishing services – from rigorous peer review, through copy-editing and strong marketing support – all the things that they would hope for from any other publisher. Many of our authors are now publishing their second and even third book with us, and our books are regularly reviewed in the national press. Strong publishing services, right from the acquisition stage, set up your future relationship with your authors and contribute to a positive reputation, and I think it’s crucial to provide such services alongside open access dissemination.

Five UCL Press staff members in front of a wooden door

Pictured (from left to right): Lara Speicher (Publishing Manager), Chris Penfold (Commissioning Editor), Alison Fox (Marketing and Distribution Manager), Jaimee Biggins (Managing Editor), Ian Caswell (Journals Manager)

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May 3, 2018

Library Publishing Curriculum: Sustainability module released

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Stack of books, "Library Publishing Curriculum", logos of LPC, Educopia, and IMLS

Professional development for library publishers has been a priority for LPC since its initial project phase. We put on lots of fantastic webinars, and of course the Library Publishing Forum can’t be beat, but there is still an unmet need for more comprehensive, structured educational resources for this growing field. Fortunately, as part of the ‘Developing a Curriculum to Advance Libary-Based Publishing‘ project, a stellar team of individuals and organizations has been working for the last year to develop a set of openly-licensed curriculum materials.  This project is a partnership of Educopia, LPC, the Public Knowledge Project, NASIG, and BlueSky to BluePrint, generously funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services.

We are delighted to announce the release of the Sustainability Module, the third module to be released in the four-part curriculum series! Two other modules, Content and Impact, were made available earlier this year, and the final module, Policy, will be released later this summer. Each module contains an introduction plus 4-7 “units” that address topics of interest. Each unit includes the following components: a narrative, a slideshow with talking notes, activities for use in a physical or virtual classroom for workshops and courses.

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May 2, 2018

Syracuse University: Building capacity for open access and open publishing

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Multi-colored umbrellas on blue sky background

As we gear up for the Library Publishing Forum and the start of a new membership year in July, we are publishing a series of member profiles. These profiles will showcase the wide variety of publishing work happening at member institutions, and celebrate our community’s contributions to the wider publishing landscape. Many thanks to the members who agreed to answer our questions! See all of the published profiles, and look for a new one each week until the Forum. 

Check out Syracuse University’s latest entry in the Library Publishing Directory!

Tell us a bit about your publishing program.

In 2017, Syracuse University Libraries created Open Publishing Services formally. (I started in June, and we just hired a project coordinator). Within the department of Research and Scholarship, our menu of services includes support for various needs relating to scholarly communications, research support, education, and the Institutional Repository. We currently take on library publishing projects selectively as time allows but do not have a full-blown library publishing program (yet!) Projects we are involved in include hosting numerous open-access journals, the institutional repository, and our Syracuse Unbound imprint. Syracuse Unbound is an imprint to foster library publishing of open-access works through collaborations between the Syracuse University Libraries and the Syracuse University Press that was created in 2013, through which we complete occasional ad hoc publishing projects. Digital Commons, Open Journal Systems, WordPress, and Ensemble are the main platforms in our publishing workflows. We have a varied program that is growing capacity.

Over the last year, our publishing projects and institutional repository (SURFACE) work focused on enhancing quality publishing practices and specifically on increasing accessibility (ADA) standards, usability, and discovery for the Digital Commons platform, our websites, and content. This is ongoing and we are continually striving to improve. For example, a re-design of our institutional repository website, SURFACE, was completed in February, and we are implementing new ingest processes for accessibility standards, and integrating accessibility into our open-access educational work.

Tell us something you have accomplished with your program that you’re proud of – big or small.

One project I am proud of is Triple Triumph: Three Women in Medicine, a monograph we published through Syracuse Unbound in August 2017. I am proud of this project because it focuses on three female physicians, who have had remarkable careers and lives. I am proud to have been a part of the process in making the work openly available for anyone to read because I found inspiration and hope in the stories. Besides that, we started the project right after I came onboard in June, and it was a lot of fun to jump right into the work.

Headshot of Amanda Page, Open publishing/copyright librarian at Syracuse University

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April 25, 2018

University of Pittsburgh: Making progress toward community-owned infrastructure

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Multi-colored umbrellas on blue sky background

As we gear up for the Library Publishing Forum and the start of a new membership year in July, we are publishing a series of member profiles. These profiles will showcase the wide variety of publishing work happening at member institutions, and celebrate our community’s contributions to the wider publishing landscape. Many thanks to the members who agreed to answer our questions! See all of the published profiles, and look for a new one each week until the Forum. 

To learn more about their program, check out Pitt’s latest Library Publishing Directory entry.

Tell us a bit about your publishing program.

Our journal publishing program was a natural outgrowth of our work with subject-based open access repositories going back to 2001.  We were among the first libraries to offer publishing services to partners outside our home institution.  Today, we publish 40 peer reviewed journals with about half of our partners external to Pitt, as well as four subject-based archives and an institutional repository.  Our portfolio includes titles in the humanities, social sciences, technology, law, and health sciences.  Our partners are diverse and range from Pitt student groups, scholarly societies, and teams of independent scholars around the world.  We are committed to making open access a reality for publication and realize that libraries can do more than advocate – we can take action in this space to lower the costs of publishing and make tangible progress towards making scholarship available to all to read and use. Whenever we can, we use open source software for our publishing and our repositories because we believe that the best future is one where the community owns the infrastructure.

Five staff members holding books in front of a bookcase

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April 24, 2018

Welcome to our seven new members!

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Our Newest Members: PALNI, Penn State, ATLA, Guelph, UNCG, Binghamton U, and Columbia

Remember when we announced a last quarter membership special? The response to it was beyond our wildest dreams, and we are very excited to announce our new members: American Theological Library Association (ATLA), Binghamton University, Columbia University, Private Academic Library Network of Indiana (PALNI), Penn State, University of Guelph, and University of North Carolina Greensboro.

All seven are full LPC members as of April 1st, and we are excited to see many of them at the upcoming Library Publishing Forum. Welcome, colleagues!


April 19, 2018

Check out LPC’s new Vision, Mission, and Values statements

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Wheat field scene with blue sky with mission, vision, values text overlaid

As part of a strategic planning process this year, LPC’s Board has revised the organization’s Vision and Mission, and has articulated a set of Values. We love these new statements, and we feel that they encapsulate the work that LPC is doing as well as the big picture goals of our community:

Vision

A scholarly publishing landscape that is open, inclusive, and sustainable.


Mission

The Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) extends the impact and sustainability of library publishing and open scholarship by providing a professional forum for developing best practices and shared expertise.


Values

  • Professionalism: We seek to improve the quality and sustainability of library publishing through advocacy, professional development, and shared best practices.
  • Openness: We believe that the products and processes of scholarly communication should be as open as possible, thereby increasing the reach and impact of scholarship worldwide.
  • Diversity: Recognizing that library publishing has a unique opportunity to amplify underrepresented voices in scholarly communication, we strive to promote inclusivity in all our professional activities.
  • Collaboration: We leverage our collective knowledge and resources to enhance our own publishing efforts and to support other libraries in developing scholarly publishing programs.
  • Innovation: As research and scholarly communication continue to evolve, we explore and engage with new technologies and new models of publishing to better support the needs of the scholarly community.

These new statements have been added to our About Us page. We welcome feedback on them from LPC members and the wider community!


April 18, 2018

Minitex: Where academic and public library publishing meet

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Multi-colored umbrellas on blue sky background

As we gear up for the Library Publishing Forum and the start of a new membership year in July, we are publishing a series of member profiles. These profiles will showcase the wide variety of publishing work happening at member institutions, and celebrate our community’s contributions to the wider publishing landscape. Many thanks to the members who agreed to answer our questions! See all of the published profiles, and look for a new one each week until the Forum. 

Tell us a bit about your publishing program.

Minitex is a multi-type consortium serving libraries primarily in Minnesota (MN), but also the Dakotas. We launched our publishing efforts in the summer of 2017 as a two-part system: 1) Minnesota Libraries Publishing Project (academic) and 2) MN Writes MN Reads (public). We designed the project to meet the specific needs of academic and public libraries, and then take advantage of the areas of overlap between the two.

The Minnesota Libraries Publishing Project (MLPP) provides a statewide instance of Pressbooks, an online publishing tool, as well as information sharing, training, and jointly-developed promotional materials for library staff. Our statewide version of Pressbooks is geo-authenticated, easy-to-access (e.g., does not require library ID), and is free of watermarks or any hidden costs. Our MLPP version of Pressbooks is being used by public, school, and academic libraries, and has seen a meteoric rise in use with 350 active authors in the nine months since we launched. We use Bibliolabs as our hosting vendor, and costs are shared by 20 academic libraries and Minitex.

MLPP also hosts a robust Community of Interest with over 30 academic libraries participating. Activities include frequent phone calls, workshop and conference programming, sharing of promotion and training materials, and peer advising to solve problems and help inform each library’s publishing practices. Academic librarians tell us that the ability to find and network with nearby peers has been one of the major advantages of MLPP.

Photo grig with staff photos and quote from text

The second linked project, MN Writes MN Reads, is funded by Minnesota’s 12 regional public library systems. This project uses Library Journal/Bibliolabs’ SELF-e system to onboard, build metadata, and circulate ebooks written by Minnesota authors.  Bibliolabs created a direct link so that any book created in Pressbooks can be automatically uploaded into the Minnesota SELF-e author collection, called Indie Minnesota. Minnesota’s public libraries are making Indie Minnesota available on their websites and through their catalogs. The public library community has just launched a statewide self-published author contest to promote the system.

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April 5, 2018

Attending the Library Publishing Forum? Volunteer to livestream!

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Image of conference attendees, information about how to volunteer in post

If you’ll be at this year’s Library Publishing Forum, consider helping us make the program more accessible to those who cannot attend in person.

We’re seeking interested volunteers to join us in a coordinated effort to capture and stream conference sessions live to Twitter. 

Here’s how this will work:

  • If you have a smartphone that you can use to capture and stream sessions to Twitter, and if you are interested in joining us in this effort, please let us know your name and contact information via this form by Friday, May 4. (Please note that we will have access to campus wifi, so you will not be required to use your wireless data connection for this.)
  • A program committee representative will host a virtual training session on Tuesday, May 8 to go over account access, Periscope livestreaming instructions, and logistics. Volunteers will then meet in person as a group on Tuesday, May 22 during breakfast to go over guidelines, details, software/hardware, and assignments.
  • Educopia will provide tripods and microphones in each room to improve the quality of the streaming.
  • Each volunteer will receive their livestreaming assignments (including session, room number and location, and presenters) via email the week before the conference. We will only stream presentations where the presenter has granted permission to do so.

We very much hope that you’ll help us make this year’s Forum the most accessible and inclusive one yet!  Please do sign up if you’re interested, or feel free to email Hannah Ballard (hannah@educopia.org) if you have any questions or concerns.

Curious about how to watch the livestreamed sessions? Follow us on Twitter (where the livestream will be shared) and keep an eye on our blog for more information.


April 2, 2018

And the winner is…

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Image of a sparkler in a forest, information about winner in post

As participation in library publishing grows, the development of a strong evidence base to inform best practices and demonstrate impact is essential. To encourage research and theoretical work about library publishing services, the Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) gives an annual Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Library Publishing. The award recognizes significant and timely contributions to library publishing theory and practice.

The LPC Research Committee is delighted to announce that this year’s award recipient is Daniel G. Tracy for his article, “Libraries as Content Producers: How Library Publishing Services Address the Reading Experience.” The work is an excellent discussion of an important and timely issue.  With the growing interest in nascent open source publishing platforms, this research on how library publishers can design for and respond to readers’ experiences is important. Daniel’s article provides a snapshot of current practices and a baseline for future activities for library publishers to assess and improve the experience for readers of their publications.  A statement from Daniel on the award:

I am honored to be selected for the Library Publishing Coalition Award for Outstanding Research. LPC is playing an important role in fostering conversation and forward momentum among library publishing programs, and I have admired its efforts in this area. The research that led to this article was motivated by a desire to see more public conversations of users of library publications and publishing platforms feed back into design. Libraries have a strong tradition of studying users of information systems, and events like the Library Publishing Forum are great opportunities to move that work forward in relation to new and evolving publishing programs.

Daniel’s work will be formally recognized at the 2018 Library Publishing Forum in Minneapolis, MN. He  will receive a cash award of $250, travel support to attend the Forum, and an opportunity to share his work with the community.

Laurie Taylor, Brian Keith, Chelsea Dinsmore, and Meredith Morris-Babb received an honorable mention for their work on the ARL SPEC kit, Libraries, Presses, and Publishing. (SPEC Kit 357). Association of Research Libraries. November 2017. https://doi.org/10.29242/spec.357


March 29, 2018

AUPresses-LPC Cross-Pollination Program recipients announced

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Association of University Presses logoThis year, LPC collaborated on a Cross-Pollination Conference Registration Waiver program to promote greater interconnectivity between members of the Association of University Presses and the LPC. The program helps two people from each organization’s membership to attend the other’s annual meeting.

Recipients of a waiver to attend the 2018 Library Publishing Forum are: James Ayers, Managing Editor at University of New Mexico Press; and Jana Faust, Manager of Digital Assets and IT at University of Nebraska Press. Recipients of a waiver to attend the 2018 AUPresses Annual Meeting are: Sarah Hare, Scholarly Communication Librarian at Indiana University; and Mark Konecny, Scholarly Communications Publishing Coordinator at the University of Cincinnati.

After attending the meetings, this cohort of 4 cross-pollinators will provide public reports on their experience. In addition to creating collegial networks between the two communities, this program is intended to encourage future collaboration between the two organizations.

Congratulations to these worthy recipients!

The 2018 Library Publishing Forum will be held in Minneapolis, May 21-23.

The 2018 AUPresses Annual Meeting will be held in San Francisco, June 17-19.

 


March 29, 2018

Announcing a new LPC sponsor: MDPI

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We are happy to announce a new organization-level sponsorship through our Publishers and Service Providers Program: MDPI.

Statement from MDPI:

MDPI is proud to support the Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) through LPC´s publisher program. We believe in the inspiring work done by the LPC library members and in the constructive collaboration across the sectors and we are therefore delighted to be a part of LPC´s vibrant community.

MDPI Academic Open Access Publishing since 1996


March 21, 2018

Accessibility F.A.Q.s page for the Library Publishing Forum

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Making the Library Publishing Forum accessible to a diverse group of attendees is a priority for the Library Publishing Coalition and for the Program Committee. Not only do we want the Forum and the library publishing community to benefit from a range of viewpoints and experiences, but we also want to acknowledge the importance of accessibility as a value of library publishing itself. This year’s keynote speaker, Catherine Kudlick, is the Director of the Paul K. Longmore Institute on Disability at San Francisco State University, and we have made accessibility one of the themes of this year’s conference. We are looking forward to some great discussion on and shared strategies for accessible publishing!

While it can be challenging for a small conference to plan for and implement many accessibility measures (like ASL translation), there are lots of things we can do easily – including providing solid information for anyone who is thinking about attending. We can also encourage attendees to let us know as early as possible how we can support their participation, as even more expensive or labor-intensive accommodations may be within reach with enough time to plan! As a small step in this direction, for the first time this year, we have created a page for frequently asked questions (F.A.Q.s) about accessibility related to the Library Publishing Forum, based on SIGACCESS’s Guide to Creating a Conference Accessibility FAQ Page. Topics covered include the venue, the transit options, and the kinds of support available. We welcome feedback and additional questions of all kinds, and look forward to building out the information even further for future Forums!

Read the F.A.Q.s