LPC Blog

The Library Publishing Coalition Blog is used to share news and updates about the LPC and the Library Publishing Forum, to draw attention to items of interest to the community, and to publish informal commentaries by LPC members and friends.

Library Publishing Coalition Quarterly Update
July 21, 2021

LPC Quarterly Update

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Check out our latest Quarterly Update! It includes:

  • Community News
    • 2021-2023 LPC Fellowship Call for Applications
    • Library Publishing Directory news
    • Recipients of the 2021 Publishing Practice Awards
    • New LPC member
    • New Strategic Affiliate
    • Kudos!
  • Library Publishing Forum
    • 2021 Forum Roundup
    • Forum reflections series
  • LPC Research
    • Updates from the Library Publishing Workflows Project
  • Blog Spotlight
    • Transitions & Intersections series

Read the Update


July 21, 2021

Finding Connectedness, Inspiration, and Comfort at the 2021 Library Publishing Forum

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Last year’s Program Committee was tasked with planning the first born-virtual Library Publishing Forum. Recognizing that a week-long online event would just add to a year’s worth of Zoom fatigue and isolation, they made a concerted effort to add as much compassion and humanity to the experience as they possibly could. (And they managed to put together an outstanding program of presenters as well!)

The Committee and Educopia staff worked closely on the logistics to put together a thought-provoking and humane Forum experience on a limited budget; we think we were successful!  So we decided to pull back the curtain on how it was run to support other organizations that are interested in hosting their own online events on a shoestring. Because we had a lot to say, we published a series of daily posts, each with a different theme.

Happy reading!

More Than a Feeling: Using Design to Create a Shared Experience by Hannah Ballard

Blending the Synchronous with the Asynchronous: Strategies for Planning a Successful Conference Program by Justin Gonder

Stick-With-What-You-Have and Add Slowly: Configuring Technology for a Virtual Conference by Nancy Adams

You Always Need More People Than You Think: Staffing a Virtual Conference by Sonya Betz

Pets, Plants and New Partnerships: Creating Space for Social Activities at LPForum21 by Lauren Collister

Sponsorship, Streamlined: How We Shifted In-Person Benefits to a Virtual Space by Caitlin Perry

Virtual Conferencing on a Shoestring: Thoughts on the Budget by Melanie Schlosser

 

If you have any questions, you can email us at contact@librarypublishing.org and we’ll try to answer them.


July 14, 2021

Call for 2022 Entries: Library Publishing Directory and IFLA Library Publishing SIG Global Library Publishing Map

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Library Publishing Coalition logo

The Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) and the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) Library Publishing Special Interest Group (LibPub SIG) have partnered to survey the landscape of publishing in libraries across the globe. LPC is seeking submissions for its 9th annual Library Publishing Directory. IFLA’s LibPub SIG has created a first-of-its-kind Map of global library publishing initiatives. Together, we invite you to share information about your library’s publishing activities. 

Libraries that complete the short form survey will appear in the IFLA LibPub Sig’s Global Library Publishing Map.  Libraries that wish to be included in the Library Publishing Directory can go on to fill out the full questionnaire (30-45 minutes to complete). Get started at  https://librarypublishing.org/lpdq-2022. (If your library has had an entry in a previous edition of the Directory, you will receive an email with instructions on how to update it. Email contact@librarypublishing.org with questions.) 

While this year the questions are in English, in the future we hope to be able to translate them into IFLA’s official languages. Responses in English are strongly preferred; we may not be able to include responses in other languages. 

The call for entries will close on Monday, September 13, 2021.

Thank you for joining in this great international collaboration. We look forward to your participation.

The Library Publishing Coalition Directory Committee
Perry Collins, University of Florida, Chair
Ian Harmon, West Virginia University
Karen Stoll Farrell, Indiana University
Nicholas Wojcik, University of Oklahoma

IFLA Special Interest Group on Library Publishing Subcommittee
Grace Liu (Canada)
Ann Okerson (USA)

About the Library Publishing Directory

The Library Publishing Directory is an important tool for libraries wishing to learn about this emerging field, connect with their peers, and align their practices with those of the broader scholarly publishing community. Last year’s edition featured over 150 libraries in almost a dozen nations.

The Directory is published openly on the web in PDF, EPUB, as an online database of current entries, and as a research data set. It includes contact information, descriptions, and other key facts about each library’s publishing services. A print version of the Directory is also produced. The 2022 edition will be published in early 2022. 

About the IFLA Library Publishing SIG Global Library Publishing Map

The goal of the LibPub SIG Global Library Publishing Map is to document more fully the publishing activities to which IFLA’s members contribute, in order to facilitate a global community of interest and support. The IFLA LibPub Sig Global Library Publishing Map accepts submissions from While this first year the focus is on scholarly/academic library publishers, in the future the SIG plans to open submissions to all types of library publishers: academic, public, and others.

Submit an entry


July 14, 2021

New LPC Resource: Library Publishing Directory Research Data Set

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Since 2014, the Library Publishing Directory has served as a yearly snapshot of the publishing endeavors of academic and research libraries.  While the original intent of the project was to raise the profile of library publishing organizations and to underline the value of this work, over the course of time the collected directories have become a unique record of the changing nature of the field, both in the activities pursued and the participants involved. 

The LPC Directory Committee and the LPC Research Committee are therefore pleased to announce the  release of a new resource for researchers interested in the field of library publishing: the Library Publishing Directory research data set

This resource is primarily composed of the data that underlie the 2014-2021 Library Publishing Directories, in csv format. Researchers will also find the original survey instrument and data dictionary for each year. For those interested in identifying changes to the survey design, a crosswalk file maps field additions and deletions over time. Finally, a readme file provides descriptive, methodological, and licensing information about the data.

The Library Publishing Coalition plans to update the data set on a yearly basis so that it can continue to be an evolving picture of the field. Our hope is that this new resource will be a generative contribution to the growing evidence base informing best practice and demonstrating the impact of library publishing services. 

Access the data set


July 12, 2021

Kudos to the 2020-21 Program Committee!

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The Kudos program recognizes impactful work done by community members on behalf of the Library Publishing Coalition community.

* * * * * * * * * *

This Kudos recognizes Justin Gonder (California Digital Library), Sonya Betz (University of Alberta), Jason Boczar (University of South Florida), A.J. Boston (Murray State University), Robin Bedenbaugh (University of Tennessee), Jane Buggle (Dublin Business School), Johanna Meetz (The Ohio State University), Regina Raboin (University of Massachusetts Medical School), David Scherer (Carnegie Mellon University), and Lauren Collister (University of Pittsburgh) for their outstanding work on the 2021 Library Publishing Forum.

Congratulations to the Program Committee for their work on our first-ever born-virtual Library Publishing Forum! They put together a stellar program (including a number of presentations from colleagues outside of North America) and their thoughtful hosting gave this all-virtual event a human touch. Kudos!

 

Some of the Program Committee members (clockwise from upper left): A.J. Boston, Regina Raboin, Robin Bedenbaugh, Sonya Betz, Justin Gonder, Jane Buggle, and Lauren Collister.

 

A few comments from Program Committee members:

It was a challenging time to be on a committee planning a conference, but with a group of people this dedicated to getting it done and getting it done well, it turned out to be an incredibly rewarding experience. I can’t wait to see all these incredible humans in person next year.

Robin Bedenbaugh

I’m proud of the two virtual programs our committee put together and am thankful for the opportunity to connect with the community in this way. We love to see it. Five out of five bloody stars. Would attend again.

A.J. Boston

It was an honor for me to be involved in the organization of this international Virtual Forum, to be part of the dynamic Program team, and to have had the opportunity to attend the great range of inspiring presentations.

Jane Buggle

It was exciting to leverage the online nature of this year’s Forum to include a broader, more diverse set of presenters and attendees, and to experiment with new ways of connecting our global library publishing community!

Justin Gonder

I have been working and collaborating with the LPC Program Planning Committee and Educopia since Spring 2019 and by far it has been the most rewarding committee experience I’ve had in my career! The collegiality, innovation, and dedication to creating the best conference experience for attendees is unparalleled – and I’m proud to be a part of this team.

Regina Raboin

The committee has much more to say about the Forum: to support other organizations that are interested in hosting thought-provoking, humane events on a shoestring, the Program Committee (and Educopia staff) are working on a series of blog posts that pull back the curtain on how and what it was like to plan and run the virtual Forum. Watch for the series later this month! 

This Kudos was submitted by Melanie Schlosser.


Library Publishing Workflows. Educopia Institute. Library Publishing Coalition. Institute of Museum and Library Sciences.
July 7, 2021

Recording of LPWorkflows ‘Working through the Pain’ panel is available!

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In May, Brandon Locke (Educopia Institute), Jennifer Beamer (Claremont Colleges Library), Sonya Betz (University of Alberta Library), and Joshua Neds-Fox (Wayne State University Libraries) discussed the lessons they’ve learned from the LPWorkflows project so far, and how the process of documentation has impacted their program’s approach at the Library Publishing Forum. The recording of their panel, Working through the Pain: How Library Publishers are Learning from Workflow Documentation is now available!

 


June 22, 2021

Publishing Practice Award: University of Cape Town Libraries

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Diversity, equity, and inclusion driving UCT Libraries publishing

At the outset, it is important to acknowledge the LPC Publishing Practice Award Committee for recognizing the contribution of the University of Cape Town’s library publishing programme to the advancement of diversity, equity, and inclusivity. Drawing from the University’s social responsiveness goal, the Library shaped its publishing programme on social justice imperatives in an attempt to deconstruct decades of legislated inequalities entrenched in the system of apartheid.

Image of UCT Publishing Programme Staff. Emma de Doncker, Tamzyn Suliaman, Bonga Siyothula, Reggie Raju, Faaediel Latief, Jill Claassen
Pictured top left to bottom right: Emma de Doncker, Tamzyn Suliaman, Bonga Siyothula, Reggie Raju, Faadiel Latief, and Jill Claassen

South Africa is a fledgling democracy that has endured decades of apartheid which compartmentalized higher education, with the historically disadvantaged black institutions being dramatically under resourced (Raju et al., 2020). UCT Libraries has taken the stance that historically advantaged institutions should have a moral obligation to share scholarly content for the advancement of research in the country as a whole and for the greater good of the public. The view held is that the sharing of scholarly output will have a domino effect of accelerating the growth of research in South Africa and Africa. Hence, UCT Libraries’ roll-out of a social justice[1] driven library publishing service to further diversity, equity and inclusivity.

(more…)


June 22, 2021

Publishing Practice Award: University of Texas at Arlington Libraries – Mavs Open Press

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Growing Together: Implementing Accessibility Practices into OER Workflows

Mavs Open Press, operated by the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries (UTA Libraries), offers no-cost services for UTA faculty, staff, and students who wish to openly publish their scholarship. The Libraries’ program provides human and technological resources that empower our communities to create or adapt open educational resources (OER). Course materials published by Mavs Open Press are openly licensed using Creative Commons licenses to allow for revision and reuse and are offered in various digital formats free of charge.

Mavs Open Press has proactively addressed accessibility and inclusion in our work through our OER training program, implementation of accessibility checks throughout the publishing process, and development of an accessibility statement and workflow. The Applied Fluid Mechanics Lab Manual was the first grant-funded OER published by Mavs Open Press and was instrumental in informing how accessibility is integrated into OER publishing at UTA.

(more…)


June 22, 2021

Announcing the 2021 Publishing Practice Award Recipients

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The Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) is excited to announce the recipients of the 2021 Publishing Practice Awards! Congratulations to the University of Texas at Arlington Libraries Mavs Open Press for exemplary work in the category of Accessibility, and to the University of Cape Town Libraries for exemplary work in the category of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

Publishing Practice Award sealThe Publishing Practice Awards are designed to recognize and raise awareness of effective and sustainable library publishing practices. They highlight library publishing programs that exemplify concepts advanced in LPC’s An Ethical Framework for Library Publishing and in LPC’s Values statement. While a representative publication is acknowledged, the focus of these awards is not on the publication’s content, but rather on the process of publishing the piece. The inaugural award categories for 2021 are Accessibility and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

(more…)


June 21, 2021

2021 Library Publishing Forum videos and slides

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Did you miss a session at the virtual 2021 Library Publishing Forum? Maybe want to see one again? Here’s your chance!

We’ve been busy in the past few weeks gathering videos, slides, etc., from our second virtual Forum and linking to them from the Forum page on our website.  Though not all sessions are available, an incredible number are, so this is a great time to watch.

Our thanks to presenters for allowing us to share and to all attendees and presenters for making this a successful online event!


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June 16, 2021

Transitions: standing on the shoulders of librarians

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Transitions is an occasional series where community members reflect on the things they have learned while moving from one institution to another or one role to another. 


By Monica Westin, Google Scholar partnerships lead / technical program manager

In the spring of 2014, I left a PhD program in classical rhetoric to try out a career in scholarly communication. I was immediately hooked by what I saw as unsolved problems in the ecosystem and the potential impact of making academic research easier to access. Except for a brief stint at HighWire Press, I spent the following four years in the institutional repository and library publishing space, first at bepress and then at CDL’s eScholarship, the University of California’s system-wide repository and publishing platform. 

One Monday in November 2018, three days after leaving my job as publications manager for the library publishing program at the CDL, I started a new role as the program manager for partnerships at Google Scholar. The past two and a half years have been eye-opening.

I have three strong memories from my first week. The first is knowing I had made the right decision to take the job when my new boss, Google Scholar co-founder and director Anurag Acharya, described the mission of Scholar to me in our first meeting: that “no matter the accident of your birth,” he told me, you should be able to know about all the papers written in any research field you might want to enter. What you did with that knowledge was up to you. 

My second memory is the expression on Anurag’s face when I admitted I didn’t really understand what robots.txt instructions did. “Goal: be more technical!” I wrote in my notebook that afternoon after spending hours looking up basic web indexing protocol information on Wikipedia. I don’t think he looked quite as disappointed as I remember, but I knew that I could no longer get away with not knowing how things worked. 

(more…)


June 15, 2021

Call for applications for 2021-2023 LPC Fellowship Program

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We’re excited to announce a call for applications for the third round of the LPC Fellowship Program. The fellowship program is intended to broaden access to library publishing to underrepresented groups, to develop research capacity in the field, and to bring new voices into the LPC community. This round of the fellowship program is centered around research, and it is aimed at library publishers who are interested in learning to do research that advances the field of library publishing. Fellowship benefits and responsibilities are scoped accordingly. Fellowships span 2 years, beginning in October 2021 and ending in September 2023. Up to two fellows will be selected. Applications are due by Monday, August 9, 2021.

LPC Fellows receive numerous benefits, including access to LPC member resources, travel support to attend the Library Publishing Forum each year of the fellowship, mentorship, and regular meetings with LPC staff and leadership. To support their research activities, this round of fellows will be provided with targeted mentorship relationships and professional development and peer support around research through LPC’s Research Committee.

Fellows are expected to undertake a research project in the field of library publishing, which they will work on throughout their fellowship. Applicants are not expected to have a research project in mind or experience doing research prior to starting the program. Fellows will serve as members of the LPC Research Committee, where they will both contribute to and benefit from that committee’s work. Fellows will write 2 to 3 blog posts per year for the LPC blog (previous posts can be found in the Fellows Journal category on the blog) and present at the 2022 and 2023 Library Publishing Forums. For more details about the fellowship, visit the program webpage or email contact@librarypublishing.org

Eligibility

Candidates should be:

  • Currently employed in a library that is not a member of the Library Publishing Coalition
  • Able to dedicate 1 to 2 hours per week to the fellowship throughout the 2 years
  • Interested in developing research skills
  • Able to attend meetings during North American business hours

Selection Process

Fellows will be selected by the Board based on the following criteria:

  • Strong candidates will have professional responsibilities related to library publishing in their current position, which could include running a publishing program or developing a new program. 
  • Strong candidates will have a demonstrated commitment to professional development in library publishing or scholarly communication. Candidates who are interested in sharing the knowledge and experience they gain during their fellowship with other professional communities will be prioritized.
  • Strong candidates will bring new perspectives to the LPC community. Candidates from underrepresented groups or regions that do not yet have professional communities related to library publishing will be especially competitive. 
  • Fellows will be expected to communicate with the LPC community through writing and presenting. Strong communication skills are required. 

Applications are due Monday, August 9, 2021, and all applicants will be notified by September 30th. Applications will include:

  • An application form (demographic info, etc.)
  • A C.V.
  • A writing sample
  • A letter of support from library dean or supervisor (as appropriate)

Learn more and apply at: https://librarypublishing.org/get-involved/lpc-fellowship-program/


June 14, 2021

LPC welcomes a new member: the University of Oklahoma

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Please join us in welcoming the University of Oklahoma as a new member of the Library Publishing Coalition. The voting rep is Jen Waller, jenwaller@ou.edu.

A statement from the University of Oklahoma:

University of Oklahoma (OU) Libraries offers journal hosting for faculty-driven, open access publications. Their scholarly publishing services team – Jen Waller, Nicholas Wojcik, Sara Huber, and Catherine Byrd – works with OU-affiliated stakeholders to create new journals or migrate existing journals to their library-hosted OJS platform. OU Libraries provides a suite of services to seven (very soon to be nine) journals and are committed to hosting journals that cover diverse, unique, and underrepresented fields and topics. The team also works on OER publishing and supporting OU’s institutional repository, SHAREOK.


June 10, 2021

LPC welcomes a new strategic affiliate: ARL

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The Library Publishing Coalition is delighted to welcome the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) as a new strategic affiliate!

About ARL:

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 125 research libraries in Canada and the US whose mission is to advance research, learning, and scholarly communication. The Association fosters the open exchange of ideas and expertise; advances diversity, equity, and inclusion; and pursues advocacy and public policy efforts that reflect the values of the library, scholarly, and higher education communities. ARL forges partnerships and catalyzes the collective efforts of research libraries to enable knowledge creation and to achieve enduring and barrier-free access to information. ARL is on the web at ARL.org.

Strategic affiliates are peer membership associations who have a focal area in scholarly communications and substantial engagement with libraries, publishers, or both. See our list of strategic affiliates or learn more about the program.

LPC Strategic Affiliates icon


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June 8, 2021

Intersections: Connecting and Collaborating – Reflections of a Consortial Library Publisher

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Intersections is an occasional series where community members reflect on what they are seeing in other parts of their professional world and what library publishers can learn from it. 


By Amanda Hurford, Private Academic Library Network of Indiana (PALNI)

A conference icebreaker recently posed the question: How do you describe your job to someone who has no idea what it is that you do? For me, this can be a difficult question to answer since working for a library consortium falls outside the boundaries of traditional librarianship.  So, when I describe what I do to someone who knows nothing of the world of library consortia, I typically say something like: “I work for a non-profit organization that connects people and works together to develop services at private college libraries across Indiana.” 

My actual job title is Scholarly Communications Director for the Private Academic Library Network of Indiana (PALNI). For the last four years, I’ve been working to develop a scholarly communications community of practice by connecting with a group of engaged librarians across the 24 PALNI-supported institutions.  We created a Schol Comm advisory group, led by a steering committee, and driven with the efforts of several work-focused teams administering programs for the consortium.  Some specific projects have been developing an open source consortial institutional repository (Hyku for Consortia), establishing our group affordable learning program (PALSave), statewide digitization of scarcely held resources (PALNI Last Copies), and finally, operationalizing publishing services for the PALNI Press.

When I started this position, I was excited for a change of pace and to work at a statewide scale.  As a former metadata and digital collections librarian, the concepts of consortia and scholarly communication were generally familiar to me.  But it’s been a whirlwind of learning about the growing consortial involvement in that space, and a significant shift, for me, working so collaboratively in every phase of a project.

For library publishers, here are some important things to know about consortia:

(more…)


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June 2, 2021

Intersections: Library Publishing and Scholarly Societies

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Intersections is an occasional series where community members reflect on what they are seeing in other parts of their professional world and what library publishers can learn from it. 


By Lauren B. Collister, Director, Office of Scholarly Communication and Publishing, University of Pittsburgh Library System, lbcollister@pitt.edu, @parnopaeus

Many people who come to librarianship have a background in a particular discipline of scholarship. In my case, this disciplinary experience is not just in the past, but rather an ongoing engagement with a scholarly discipline through work for a scholarly society. This work not only gives me insight into the lived experiences of scholars in my discipline who are attempting to carry out the open scholarship and publishing practices that we in the Library Publishing community often advocate for, but also presents opportunities for me to share resources and knowledge that can help the society and its members with their work. I hope that by sharing my experience with one scholarly society, I can inspire other people in our field to consider engaging with a disciplinary scholarly society as a way to not only develop and hone your own skills, but also to bring the practices and values of the library publishing community to the disciplines.

In my case, my scholarly background is in linguistics, and the scholarly society for linguists in the United States is the Linguistic Society of America (LSA). I was a student member during my PhD days; not only was I involved as a local host for the conference when it was in Pittsburgh, but I also took advantage of several of the training workshops as well as the job listings. When I transitioned to library work in 2013 with a new position in the library publishing program at the University Library System, University of Pittsburgh, my membership in the society lapsed for a few years because I was very busy learning about my new job. However, when I heard that the LSA was planning its 2016 Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., and that part of the conference would include an Advocacy Day at the Capitol and meetings with Senators and Representatives, I was excited to sign up again to go back to the LSA conference.

The opportunity to advocate for linguistics, the discipline where I first felt like a scholar, was what drew me back to the Society, and while at the Annual Meeting I discovered another opportunity: the newly-formed Committee on Scholarly Communication in Linguistics. I attended the first meeting and immediately signed up. As a Scholarly Communications Librarian with a PhD in Linguistics, what more perfect service opportunity could there be?

(more…)


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May 18, 2021

Transitions: First Year as Faculty

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Transitions is an occasional series where community members reflect on the things they have learned while moving from one institution to another or one role to another. 


By Laura Miller, Florida State University

As I am writing this post, I am about three weeks away from my one-year anniversary as a full-time library faculty member at Florida State University. I transitioned into my current role as Visiting Open Publishing Librarian from a Graduate Assistantship in May 2020. Like many other early-twenty-somethings, I found myself starting my first full-time job remotely due to the pandemic. I am fortunate that my new role was housed in the same department as my assistantship, and that I even report to the same supervisor. Being able to see familiar faces on Zoom and Teams has made the transition from part-time to full-time much easier. Despite having the comforts of familiar colleagues at an institution I’ve called home since 2014, the jump from part-time to full-time and student worker to faculty has not been without its challenges.

As a GA, I worked on a number of open access publishing and scholarly communications projects. Being able to see projects through which I had contributed to or laid the groundwork for in previous years was one of the most gratifying aspects of my transition to Open Publishing Librarian. I’m able to troubleshoot technical issues for journals that were just developing when I was a GA, and I have published revised editions of a textbook I assisted with two years ago. With the added hours in my work week, I am able to pay greater attention to accessibility and refine publishing workflows that were ad hoc before my publishing-dedicated position was created. This more strategic and directed approach to library publishing culminated in the formation of Florida State Open Publishing (FSOP) last Fall which brought my office’s publishing, hosting, and consulting services under one cohesive initiative.  (more…)


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May 4, 2021

Intersections: Not Quite a Librarian, Not Quite a Publisher: What It’s Like to Work for a Library and a University Press

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Intersections is an occasional series where community members reflect on what they are seeing in other parts of their professional world and what library publishers can learn from it. 


By Annie Johnson, Assistant Director of Open Publishing Initiatives and Scholarly Communications, Temple University @anniekjohn

For the past five years, I have worked for both Temple University Libraries and Temple University Press. Library colleagues at other institutions tend to assume I work for the Press. Press colleagues tend to assume I work for the Libraries. The truth is a bit more nuanced: much of my work involves leading what might be considered typical scholarly communication initiatives within the Libraries. However, my supervisor is the Director of the Press, Mary Rose Muccie, and I support the Press in important ways, particularly when it comes to open access and born-digital projects. That work has involved publishing the Press’s first digital companion to a print book, serving as the primary investigator for an NEH grant to digitize and make openly available out-of-print Press books in labor studies, and launching Temple’s instance of the digital publishing platform Manifold, which the Press now uses as a portal for its open access books. Most recently, we started a joint Libraries/Press imprint, North Broad Press, that publishes open textbooks written by Temple faculty. 

Temple University Press is one of a number of presses that reports to its library. This is an increasingly common situation, which has resulted in the creation of positions like mine that try to bridge the two organizations. Despite its prevalence, some in scholarly publishing still worry about presses reporting to libraries, and question whether such a relationship actually benefits university presses. I understand the concerns, especially when these changes happen during moments when the larger university is in crisis. But I was not hired to dismantle or replace the work of the Press. Quite the opposite: I help the Press experiment with new publishing models in ways that they would simply not have the capacity to do otherwise. My involvement does not take away from the excellent work the Press staff are doing, it enhances it. I help get Temple University Press books out to more people around the globe while strengthening the Press’s relationship with the larger university. (more…)


April 19, 2021

LPC welcomes a new strategic affiliate: CLOCKSS

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The Library Publishing Coalition is delighted to welcome CLOCKSS as a new strategic affiliate! A statement from CLOCKSS:

We are looking forward to working with LPC and the LPC community!

A collaboration of the world’s leading academic publishers and research libraries, CLOCKSS provides a sustainable dark archive to ensure the long-term survival of Web-based scholarly content.

CLOCKSS (Controlled LOCKSS) employs a unique approach to archiving (Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) that was initiated by Stanford University librarians in 1999. Digital content is stored in the CLOCKSS archive with no user access unless a “trigger” event occurs. The LOCKSS technology regularly checks the validity of the stored data and preserves it for the long term. CLOCKSS operates 12 archive nodes at leading academic institutions worldwide, preserving the authoritative versions of 43 million journal articles, over 25,000 serial and 240,000 book titles, and a growing collection of supplementary materials and metadata information. As of March 2020, 64 titles have been triggered and made available from our archive via open access. CLOCKSS participants include 300 libraries and 400 publishers.

This secure, robust, and decentralized infrastructure can withstand threats from technological, economic, environmental, and political failures. A destructive event in one location won’t jeopardize the survival of preserved digital content because the 11 other locations serve as mirror sites to back-up and repair the disrupted location’s archive.

CLOCKSS is governed by and for its stakeholders. Our operations are governed by a Board of Directors with an equal number of librarians and publishers making decisions together about policies, procedures, priorities, and when to trigger content. As an independent, tax-exempt 501(c)(3) not-for-profit charitable organization, CLOCKSS is committed to keeping its fees affordable, for libraries and publishers of all sizes and budgets to participate in CLOCKSS. Low operating costs make it possible to keep this commitment. As a long-term preservation organization, CLOCKSS believes that a robust Succession Plan is required. In the unlikely event of the demise of CLOCKSS, four of our twelve library nodes have committed to continuing the preservation of the content in the Archive.

As the only dark archive that assigns a Creative Commons license to all triggered digital content, CLOCKSS benefits the greater global scholarly community by enabling permanent Open Access to abandoned and orphaned publications. As a result, recovered content becomes perpetually available to anyone with Internet access.

Strategic affiliates are peer membership associations who have a focal area in scholarly communications and substantial engagement with libraries, publishers, or both. See our list of strategic affiliates or learn more about the program.

LPC Strategic Affiliates icon


Library Publishing Coalition Quarterly Update
April 13, 2021

LPC Quarterly Update

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Check out our latest Quarterly Update! It includes:

  • Community News
    • Research Interests Match Program
    • LPC statement supporting Asian Americans and Asians
    • New LPC board members elected
    • New Strategic Affiliate
    • 2021 Library Publishing Directory
    • LPC Roadmap for Anti-Racist Practice
    • Library Publishing Documentation Toolkit
    • Kudos!
  • Library Publishing Forum
    • Updates for the Forum
  • LPC Research
    • Updates from the Library Publishing Workflows Project
  • Blog Spotlight
    • Transitions series

Read the Update