Posts by Melanie Schlosser

March 21, 2019

Announcing the winners of the 2019 Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Library Publishing

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As participation in library publishing grows, the development of a strong evidence base to inform best practices and demonstrate impact is essential. To encourage research and theoretical work about library publishing services, the Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) gives an annual Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Library Publishing. The award recognizes significant and timely contributions to library publishing theory and practice.

LPC’s Research Committee is delighted to announce that this year’s award recipients are Kate McCready and Emma Molls for their article, “Developing a Business Plan for a Library Publishing Program.” With the continued growth of library publishing programs, McCready and Molls’s article provides a business plan template that can be used to assist library publishers as they work to provide an understanding of program goals and services to their campus communities. This excellent article is highly relevant, very timely, and has the potential to change practice among library publishers.

Kate and Emma’s work will be formally recognized at the 2019 Library Publishing Forum in Vancouver, BC. They will receive a cash award of $250, travel support to attend the Forum, and an opportunity to share this work with the community.

In addition, the Committee has decided to award honorable mentions to Dave S. Ghamandi for his article, “Liberation through Cooperation: How Library Publishing Can Save Scholarly Journals from Neoliberalism”  and Stephanie S. Rosen for her work, Accessibility & Publishing, Ghamandi’s piece engages with both the practical and the theoretical, providing a conceptual foundation for the development of publishing models that offer an alternative to the current paradigm, which he argues operates from a neoliberal ideology. Rosen’s work foregrounds accessibility as a primary concern of publishing, drawing attention to the importance of an intentional focus on accessibility issues if we are truly to work towards an ethical and equitable publishing future.

Finally, the committee would like to recognize the important work of the Library Publishing Coalition Ethical Framework Task Force for their publication, Ethical Framework for Library Publishing.


Promo image for 2019 Forum
March 6, 2019

Preliminary program for the Library Publishing Forum is live!

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The preliminary program for the 2019 Library Publishing Forum is now available, with titles and presenter names for all sessions.  Abstracts and other details will follow later this month.  As you can see, we have a ton of fantastic sessions from a wide range of presenters, as well as a couple of optional lunchtime meetups. We are also delighted to announce that the Forum reception on Thursday evening (May 9) will be held at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art!

Past Forum attendees may note a difference in this year’s program, with four concurrent sessions in each time slot. This is an experiment by the Program Committee to balance the limitations of space and time with the many excellent proposals which were submitted. We look forward to hearing the community’s feedback on this setup to inform the program for future Forums!

View the Preliminary Program


Promo image for 2019 Forum
February 25, 2019

LPC-AUPresses Cross-Pollination Waivers for 2019 are here!

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Last year, LPC and our strategic affiliate the Association of University Presses (AUPresses) partnered on a very successful cross-pollination program for our two conferences. Two LPC community members received registration waivers to attend the AUPresses Annual Meeting in San Francisco, and two AUPResses members joined us for the 2018 Forum in Minneapolis. You can read the reflections from the awardees on our blog. To keep up the cross-pollinating, we are offering the same program this year! Applications are due March 8th.

Association of University Presses logo

Details and Application


February 18, 2019

LPC featured on Educopia’s blog as part of community cultivation series

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New blog post on community acceleration

To accompany the release last fall of its Community Cultivation Field Guide, the Educopia Institute launched a new blog and a series of posts on community cultivation. The series includes a case study of each stage in the community lifecycle, featuring Educopia’s affiliated communities. To illustrate what the “acceleration” stage might look like, I contributed a post on LPC’s recent strategic planning process. Check it out!

Read the Post


February 11, 2019

LPC Board elections: Candidate bios and statements

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Elections for the Library Publishing Coalition Board open today and will continue through Friday, March 1st. Instructions for voting will be sent to each member institution’s voting representative. The candidates are:

  • Jennifer Beamer, The Claremont Colleges Library
  • Karen Bjork, Portland State University
  • Christine Fruin, American Theological Library Association
  • Sarah Hare, Indiana University
  • Annie Johnson, Temple University
  • Mark Konecny, University of Cincinnati

Each candidate has provided a brief biography and an election statement:

(more…)


Water with the word reflections in all caps with a horizontal line above and below
February 6, 2019

Academy-owned? Academic-led? Community-led? What’s at stake in the words we use to describe new publishing paradigms

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Editor’s note: This blog post is LPC’s official contribution to Academic Led Publishing Day (ALPD), a global digital event to foster discussions about how members of the scholarly community can develop and support academic-led publishing initiatives. LPC is participating in ALPD because it presents an opportunity to have a multi-stakeholder discussion about an issue of growing importance to libraries, and to call attention to the lack of a shared vision in this critical area. Our goals in this post are to highlight some of the unresolved questions in this space and to call on libraries to grapple with them.

This post was co-authored by Melanie Schlosser (LPC Community Facilitator) and Catherine Mitchell (Director, Publishing & Special Collections, California Digital Library; Past President of the LPC Board).

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There is no question that we are facing significant challenges and opportunities as the traditional publishing model begins to falter. How the academy positions itself at this moment will have consequences for years to come.

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“Academy-owned” seems to be the descriptor du jour in scholarly communications circles.  We talk increasingly about academy-owned infrastructure, academy-owned publishing, academy-owned publications, etc. We find ourselves at meetings and conferences where we explore the challenges of supporting new forms of scholarly research, new modes of publication, new communities of readers — and there it is again — “academy-owned,” lurking in the conversation. We write grants whose very premise is that the academy will rise to claim its rightful place as the source, the maker, the distributor, the curator of its greatest asset — knowledge. There is definitely a movement afoot.

Why has this phrase taken hold lately? The landscape is increasingly dominated by large, multinational corporations that are vacuuming up tools and platforms throughout the scholarly communication lifecycle. Although many of these corporations are familiar to libraries as content publishers, they are expanding their reach well beyond publishing to control both upstream and downstream activities: pre-print servers, OA publishing platforms, current research information systems, etc. A rebellion is stirring among those who worry that we are increasingly abdicating control of the academy’s intellectual property, its data, its ability to share information — even its values — to for-profit companies. The more we rely on licensed resources to read, distribute, and measure the impact of our research — as well as to determine the success of our researchers and the value of our institutions — the more in thrall the academy is to a set of values that are derived from a profit-driven marketplace founded on restricted access to information and abstract performance metrics.

And yet this noble impulse to claim a space for the academy in the exchange and evaluation of scholarly research is also rife with linguistic confusion. While the drive toward “academy-owned” solutions is pervasive, the language we use to articulate this drive lacks precision. Sometimes we talk about “academy-owned” projects, but just as often we describe them as “academic-led” or “community-led” or any number of other permutations. [1] These phrases are not synonymous — their distinctions are actually quite important — yet we use them interchangeably and nod to each other, as if we know what we mean. What, exactly, do we mean? It’s time to ask ourselves to identify the big issues and difficult questions embedded both in the terms themselves and the vagueness with which we use them.

(more…)


January 24, 2019

Article on LPC published in Library Trends

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There’s an article about the Library Publishing Coalition in the Fall 2018 issue of Library Trends! If you’re not familiar with it, Library Trends is a quarterly journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press. Each issue is guest-edited and focused on a single theme. This issue’s editor is Lewis G. Liu (City University of New York), and its theme is “The Role and Impact of Commercial and Noncommercial Publishers in Scholarly Publishing on Academic Libraries.” Dr. Liu reached out to me in late 2017 and invited a contribution to the issue on the LPC. The resulting article, “Building Capacity for Academy-Owned Publishing through the Library Publishing Coalition,” explores the history, current activities, and future directions for the LPC.

A note about rights: Library Trends is a subscription journal that asks for a full copyright transfer from its authors. While LPC’s Board and I were excited about this opportunity to share the work we are doing with a broader audience, openness is a central value of the LPC community, and we were not comfortable contributing to a journal under these terms. With the support of the Board, I asked for and received an alternative author agreement that allowed me to retain copyright ownership of the article (the issue-level copyright statement on the PDF notwithstanding) and share it openly.

With thanks to Dr. Liu for the invitation, the Library Trends staff for their flexibility, and LPC’s Board for their support and suggestions on the manuscript, here is the final article!

  • Citation: Schlosser, M. (2018).  Building Capacity for Academy-Owned Publishing through the Library Publishing Coalition. Library Trends, 67(2), 359-375.

Read the Article (PDF)

 

The issue also includes two other articles related to library publishing, one of which is written by a number of LPC community members!

  • Li, Y., Lippincott, S., Hare, S., Wittenberg, J., Preate, S., Page, A., & Guiod, S. The Library-Press Partnership: An Overview and Two Case Studies. 319-336.
  • Moulaison, H., & Bially Mattern, J. Academic Library-Based Publishing: A State of the Evolving Art. 337-358.


January 14, 2019

Registration open for last two Library Publishing Curriculum pilot workshops

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The Educopia Institute and the Library Publishing Coalition are pleased to open registration for the last set of pilot workshops for the IMLS-funded  Developing A Curriculum to Advance Library-Based Publishing project, based on the Policy Module. For our last two workshops, we are piloting two entirely new formats: an asynchronous virtual workshop and an in-person “Policy Lab.” Both workshops will be taught by Library Publishing Curriculum project leads Melanie Schlosser (Library Publishing Coalition Community Facilitator) and Katherine Skinner (Executive Director, Educopia Institute).  The workshops have been designed as a series, and participants are encouraged to take both if they are able.  

Library Publishing Curriculum: Policy Virtual Workshop

In March, we will hold a completely asynchronous, 4-week virtual workshop based on the four units of the Policy Module. Each week, participants will watch a recorded lecture, explore a reading or other related resource, and participate in a discussion on Slack. The virtual workshop will provide an opportunity for participants to explore topics in depth and to build a foundation for policy development at their institution.

Registration is free but attendance is capped at 40 participants. Our previous virtual workshops have filled up within days, so register as soon as possible!

Register for the virtual workshop

Library Publishing Curriculum: Policy Lab

On May 7 (the day before the 2019 Library Publishing Forum), library publishers will have the opportunity to participate in a “Policy Lab” workshop. The day will be focused on discussion and hands-on activities, and each participant will leave with two draft policies for their library publishing program, related to copyright, legal agreements, diversity, or preservation. To help participants get the most out of the lab, they will be given access to the recorded lectures from the virtual workshop ahead of time. The workshop will be held at Simon Fraser University’s Harbour Centre campus in Vancouver, BC.

Registration is US$75 for the full-day workshop (including breakfast, lunch, and coffee breaks) and participation is capped at 20 attendees.

Register for the Policy Lab

About the Policy Module

The Policy Module of the Library Publishing Curriculum covers how library publishers develop policies that guide specific areas of their work. Its initial release was focused on policies related to copyright, diversity, and digital preservation, and guidance on creating legal agreements.

Authors: Sara Benson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Harriet Green (Washington University St. Louis), Merinda Hensley (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Janet Swatscheno (University of Illinois Chicago), Melanie Schlosser (Educopia Institute), Katherine Skinner (Educopia Institute)


Promo image for 2019 Forum
January 14, 2019

Apply for the Library Publishing Forum Award

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LPC is delighted to once again offer travel scholarships for first-time attendees. For 2019, we have increased both the number and amount of the awards: three awards of $1,200 each plus conference registration. The Library Publishing Forum Award is part of our efforts to increase the diversity and inclusiveness of our community and to promote the broadest possible participation at the Library Publishing Forum. The application deadline is Sunday, February 3rd, so get your applications in!

Learn more and apply


Promo image for 2019 Forum
January 14, 2019

It’s time to register for the Library Publishing Forum!

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Registration is now open for the Library Publishing Forum and for Opening the Classroom: Publishing Open Educational Resources (preconference).

Library Publishing Forum registration (May 9-10)

More information about registration, including rates and refund policies, can be found on the Registration and Travel page. The registration deadline is April 19th.

Register for the Forum

Preconference registration (May 8)

Don’t miss out on this year’s preconference, Opening the Classroom: Publishing Open Educational Resources, co-sponsored by the Open Textbook Network and BCcampus. You can register for the whole day, or choose to attend just the morning textbook publishing workshop or the afternoon mini-conference. Space is limited for this one (especially the workshop, which is limited to 50 participants), so make sure to register early!

Register for the Preconference

 


LPC logo, quarterly update, image of pen and envelopes
January 10, 2019

LPC Quarterly Update

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Check out our latest Quarterly Update! It includes:

  • New members and a new strategic affiliate
  • Winner of the first annual LPC Award for Exemplary Service
  • Call for nominations for our annual research award
  • LPC/Open Textbook Network webinar exchange
  • Library Publishing Forum
    • Registration coming soon
    • Schedule at-a-glance
    • Travel information
  • Featured resource: New updates to the Library Publishing Bibliography


January 9, 2019

Matt Ruen receives the first annual LPC Award for Exemplary Service

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As participation in library publishing grows, community involvement and leadership has become increasingly important for the profession. To this end, the LPC Board established the LPC Award for Exemplary Service, recognizing substantial contributions by an LPC community member to advancing the mission, vision, and values of the Library Publishing Coalition.

Whimsical headshot of Matt in front of a buildingOn behalf of the LPC Board, we are delighted to announce that the recipient of the 2018 LPC Award for Exemplary Service is Matt Ruen (Grand Valley State University). Matt is being recognized for his dedicated service on the LPC Program Committee, and was praised by committee members as an “excellent listener who leads the group gently toward programmatic, thoughtful action.” In his second consecutive term as committee chair, Matt has guided the Program Committee during a time when the Library Publishing Forum has grown significantly, and has helped to create effective structures for program planning and handling an increasing volume of proposals.

In addition to his work on the Program Committee, Matt served as an instructor for a Library Publishing Curriculum workshop at this year’s Digital Library Federation Forum, educating other librarians about best practices and standards in library publishing.

Matt will receive a complimentary registration to this year’s Library Publishing Forum, a $50 gift card, and he will be recognized at the Forum.


January 9, 2019

January is Shared Documentation Month for the LPC

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One of LPC’s most important member resources is the Shared Documentation portal, which allows members to build on each other’s work by sharing policies, procedures, MOUs, position descriptions, and other internal documentation that’s produced by library publishing organizations. To increase awareness and facilitate use of the shared documentation, this January will be our first-ever Shared Documentation Month! If you’re at a member institution, keep an eye on the list each Wednesday this month for a message where we highlight a shared document and provide tools and resources to support use of the Shared Documentation.

Not at a member institution? Consider LPC membership for your library!

LPC Publishers & Service Providers