Forum News

October 23, 2018

Save the date: 2019 Library Publishing Forum preconference on publishing OERs

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Promo image for 2019 Forum

Mark your calendar – on Wednesday, May 8, 2019, join us in Vancouver, BC for Opening the Classroom: Publishing Open Educational Resources, cosponsored by BCcampus and Open Textbook Network. As the use of OERs continues to grow throughout the academy, this preconference will address the growing need for distinctive practices for developing, supporting, and hosting OERs as part of library publishing. The morning will consist of a hands-on textbook publishing workshop, and the afternoon will include panels and presentations. Visit the event page to learn more, and keep an eye out for more information!


October 12, 2018

Now open: Call for proposals for the 2019 Library Publishing Forum!

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Promo image for 2019 Forum

Have a cool project happening at your library? Mulling over a big topic? Want an excuse to collaborate with peers in the library publishing world? You’re in luck – the call for proposals for the 2019 Library Publishing Forum is now open! As we did for the 2018 Forum, we are accepting proposals for two different types of sessions: individual presentations (15 minutes) and full sessions (60 minutes). Individual presentations are a great opportunity to showcase a project, a workflow, an in-progress program or research project, etc. Full sessions will dig a little deeper, with multi-institution presentations or interactive formats.

While we don’t have a formal conference theme, we do have a set of mini-themes and topic suggestions, inspired by LPC’s new strategic plan:

  • Proposals that consider and promote discussions of diversity and inclusion
  • Case studies that highlight new initiatives, partnerships, or research
  • Sessions that focus on professional development and shared best practices
  • Sessions that envision the library publishing community working together (or joining forces with others) to tackle challenges at scale
  • Sessions exploring the role of library publishing in the bigger context of scholarly communication

Proposals are due November 30, so put your thinking cap on! For more information, view the full call for proposals. If you’re ready to submit, head on over to the submission form:

Submit a Proposal


August 30, 2018

Variety and values: Reflections on the Library Publishing Forum

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LPC AUPresses Cross-Pollination Waiver Recipients banner image

For our 2018 conferences, the Library Publishing Coalition and the Association of University Presses collaborated on a Cross-Pollination Registration Waiver Program. The program sent two AUPresses members to the Library Publishing Forum and two LPC members to the AUPresses Annual Meeting. Each of the recipients was asked to write a reflection on their experience and on opportunities for libraries and presses to work together towards our shared goals. This post is by Jana Faust, University of Nebraska Press.  Read the whole series

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“A couple of things that stood out to me at the conference were individuals’ passion for their work and their commitment to a set of values that would create a culture of inclusivity.”

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The University of Nebraska Press and University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries often collaborate but they continue to be separate units of the university. It is most common for UNP to work with the UNL Libraries’ Center for Digital Research in the Humanities (specific examples include the Willa Cather Archive and The Journals of the Lewis & Clark Expedition Online), Archives and Special Collections, and the institutional repository.

I went into the Library Publishing Forum not knowing very much about the more recent models of library publishing programs except that it has become more common for institutions to merge what had traditionally been two separate programs. I hoped to learn more about the purpose of these new models and how they differ from more traditional publishing. One thing that became apparent immediately is that there is as much variety in library publishing (in size, output, and workflow) as there is in university press publishing.

A couple of things that stood out to me at the conference were individuals’ passion for their work and their commitment to a set of values that would create a culture of inclusivity. In order to create the desired culture, many of these programs started by determining their values and then used those values as the foundation of their publishing programs. I would have expected the planning stage to focus more on practical issues: what types of content or subject areas to publish, how to handle peer review, and so forth. Instead, they often first documented their commitment to a culture of diversity, inclusivity, accessibility, and equity. I found the keynote by Cathy Kudlick, professor of history and director of the Paul K. Longmore Institute on Disability at San Francisco State University, particularly enlightening. She urged attendees to “see disability as a tool for thinking differently about the world,” to picture pirates as disability action figures, and to go beyond compliance. In addition, she described people with disabilities as being the world’s best problem solvers. (more…)


August 29, 2018

Seeing each other: Reflections on library/press cross-pollination

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LPC AUPresses Cross-Pollination Waiver Recipients banner image

For our 2018 conferences, the Library Publishing Coalition and the Association of University Presses collaborated on a Cross-Pollination Registration Waiver Program. The program sent two AUPresses members to the Library Publishing Forum and two LPC members to the AUPresses Annual Meeting. Each of the recipients was asked to write a reflection on their experience and on opportunities for libraries and presses to work together towards our shared goals. This post is by Sarah Hare, Indiana University.  Read the whole series

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“In my experience, press partners often bring an important understanding of workload and fiscal responsibility to these projects while librarians bring a passion for open access and experimentation.”

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Why cross-pollinate?

In 2016, Charles Watkinson wrote “Why Marriage Matters: A North American Perspective on Press/Library Partnerships,” which presented a compelling argument for why presses and libraries, as “natural allies in the quest to create a more equitable scholarly publishing system,” should pursue “long-term, deeply embedded partnerships” (p. 342). The article also proposed a taxonomy for understanding library/press relationships and cited noteworthy models for collaboration beyond the “press reports to library” arrangement.

I believe that Watkinson’s recommendations for embracing library/press partnerships in order to better serve the institution both entities are embedded within have only become more relevant. Thinking strategically and realistically about shared library/press work has become imperative at my own institution, Indiana University Bloomington.

In 2012, IU Provost Lauren Robel created the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP). The OSP is a partnership between Indiana University Press and IU Libraries’ Scholarly Communication Department. The OSP aims to harness disparate publishing resources and strategically pool expertise in order to transform scholarly publishing at IU. This often happens by:

  • Serving IU faculty and students through journal publishing, open access book publishing, and course material publishing
  • Moving conversations on publishing innovations forward at IU, including discussion on experimental peer review, course material affordability, hybrid OA models, open-source infrastructure, and new modes of scholarship (for example, 3-D object and multimedia integration)
  • Educating the next generation of scholars, both through supporting the creation of student publishing projects and creating programming and hands-on experiences for students interested in publishing, open access, and scholarly career paths

This work requires a shared understanding and committed collaboration from library/press partners. Thus, in addition to learning more about what presses are doing operationally, I applied to the AUPresses/LPC cross-pollination registration waiver program to answer larger questions I had about press values and the university press community’s interests. I also wanted to learn about how others approach library/press collaboration, work toward truly seeing each other, understand the values and ethics of the other partner, and maintain a fruitful relationship through the constant change and innovation inherent in scholarly publishing work today. (more…)


August 28, 2018

Advancing shared goals: Reflections on press/library partnerships

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LPC AUPresses Cross-Pollination Waiver Recipients banner image

For our 2018 conferences, the Library Publishing Coalition and the Association of University Presses collaborated on a Cross-Pollination Registration Waiver Program. The program sent two AUPresses members to the Library Publishing Forum and two LPC members to the AUPresses Annual Meeting. Each of the recipients was asked to write a reflection on their experience and on opportunities for libraries and presses to work together towards our shared goals. This post is by James Ayers, University of New Mexico Press.  Read the whole series

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“Perhaps my greatest takeaway was that libraries often fail to see their university’s press as an asset in the accomplishment of their goals, and presses often fail to see how a relationship with their university’s library could help to advance their own mission.”

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In March of this year, the University of New Mexico Press entered into an administrative reporting relationship with the University of New Mexico’s College of Libraries. Because this new relationship created opportunities for collaborations between the press and the library—especially where publishing initiatives are concerned—I became interested in developing a better understanding of what university libraries are pursuing in terms of publishing and how they are accomplishing these goals. The Library Publishing Forum seemed an excellent opportunity to learn firsthand what publishing initiatives were of interest to university libraries and how they were pursuing these aims. My hope was to find avenues by which a library-press relationship might either facilitate the accomplishment of existing publishing goals or create new, shared goals.

At the forum I had the chance to attend a variety of panels that highlighted many of the questions I wanted to explore, and I was also able to make some valuable connections with library staff from other institutions and discuss topics of interest to us both. Much of my time at the Library Publishing Forum was spent learning about library publishers’ “in the weeds” experiences, and it was very illuminating to hear about the problems they encountered and the solutions they realized. It was incredibly valuable to see some of the specific projects library publishers have begun or completed, and I made my observations with an eye toward how a library-press relationship might be beneficial to both departments. (more…)


July 9, 2018

Digital Publishing Your Way: Moving Toward Multimodal, Flexible Platforms

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Editor’s note: This is part of a series of reflections by community members on the recent Library Publishing Forum. See the whole series

The 2018 Library Publishing Forum preconference, Owned by the Academy, gave participants a chance to learn more about publishing platforms that have a commitment to community-owned infrastructure. Elsevier’s 2017 acquisition of bepress put a spotlight on this issue, so, for many, including myself, this preconference was a welcomed chance to explore both well-established and up-and-coming open source publishing alternatives.

Publishing platforms can be a place where libraries do research and development, finding new partnerships and collaboration opportunities, working with new types of scholarship and methods, and experimenting with new technologies. I thus found the most exciting takeaway from this preconference to be the possibilities of new (and continued) development in open source publishing. Many of these communities are thinking more actively about non-traditional forms of scholarship, multimodal scholarship, and other ways in which academia is embracing, incorporating, and sharing new expressions of scholarship. Many platforms are also emphasizing sustainability and trying to provide multiple ways of engaging in these systems, including options for assisted setup and/or hosting. While no platform is “perfect” (as if such a thing exists), progress towards the next wave of scholarly needs is tangible.

“We all have different services we provide to meet needs on campus, so I find it equally important to have tools that can support us as needs, workflows, and services change. Platforms should support people-based services, not dictate or confine what those services should be.”

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July 5, 2018

What’s it like to be the local host of the Library Publishing Forum?

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Editor’s note: This is part of a series of reflections by community members on the recent Library Publishing Forum. See the whole series. This post is guest written by Kate McCready and Laureen Boutang, from the University of Minnesota Libraries. 

When we first considered the idea of hosting the Library Publishing Forum at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, we were very excited about the opportunities that could come from being a local host. We saw it as a way to strengthen our relationship with the Library Publishing Coalition, and support the work of the library publishing community. We also hoped that bringing the events to campus would allow our U of MN colleagues to have the opportunity to learn more about library publishing in general, and our program specifically. We thought it would build understanding about why our institution was devoting resources to scholarly publishing activities. Of course, we also wanted a meaningful conference for those attending! All of these hopes were realized and we learned a lot about bringing an event to campus as well.  

As we dove into thinking about logistics and providing on-the-ground knowledge of the location, we realized that for our hopes to succeed, we had a lot of work to do. There were many details that would need our attention if the Forum and affiliated events were to run smoothly. Looking back at our work preparing for the Forum over the last year, it can be loosely categorized in four areas. First, we needed to gain buy-in at our home institution at many levels. Second, we had to work with many constituents (local colleagues, program committee colleagues, event staff, LPC colleagues, etc.) to determine the priorities and requirements for the events. Third, while the Forum is a self-supporting conference and the Library Publishing Coalition provides financial and logistical resources for it, we worked to provide additional local staffing and financial resources to support our priorities as the host institution. Finally, we spent time to get and stay organized. (more…)


July 2, 2018

Call for proposals to host the 2020 Library Publishing Forum

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We are currently accepting proposals from LPC members to host the 2020 Library Publishing Forum. The Forum typically welcomes 150-200 guests for 3 days of preconference and conference activities. The LPC aims to hold the Forum in a variety of attractive locations throughout North America that provide convenient access for our members through geographic proximity or easily accessible transportation. The LPC seeks an institution willing to act as a partner in providing access to library-owned spaces, or co-signing contracts for spaces at reduced costs. The call is open through August 31, 2018.

Host responsibilities

The Forum is financed through conference registration fees and sponsor support, and the Educopia Institute will handle all conference planning and logistics. The host institution is not required to provide additional financial support. However, local organizers should provide referrals to appropriate venues for the main conference activities, pre- and post- events, and hotel stays. The host institution should also plan to have a staff member serve as the Host Liaison on the Program Committee. The Host Liaison has a one-year, non-voting role, and is invited to attend committee meetings, but is not obligated to undertake more general committee work. In addition, we welcome support from local hosts in planning a reception and coordinating appropriate social events. (more…)


June 11, 2018

Challenges and opportunities (but mostly opportunities) for open source infrastructure in library publishing

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Editor’s note: This is part of a series of reflections by community members on the recent Library Publishing Forum. See the whole series. This post is guest written by Alison McGonagle-O’Connell, Editoria Community Manager and Owned by the Academy presenter. 

As a first-time Library Publishing Forum attendee, presenter, and a participant in the “Owned by the Academy” pre-meeting, I was struck by how truly welcoming and collaborative this group is! These meetings also provided me with a few key takeaways:

  1. Open Source (OS) publishing technologies are proliferating, and are of increasing interest to the broader library publishing community.
  2. These tools and platforms represent one way for the community to reclaim some control of the scholarly communication marketplace.
  3. Hosted service models for OS tools will be necessary for some to take the leap from commercial products.
  4. OS providers need to work together to ensure interoperability, and to effectively map tool capabilities to the unique needs and requirements of the community

The first two takeaways are general observations, largely supported by those who attended, tweeted, and have subsequently discussed the meetings openly. OS technology gives organizations the ability to design and customize platforms to support their own needs and values. There is significant freedom in not being locked in to a commercial solution’s unalterable roadmap. Want to design accessibility into the platform with your user community? Go ahead! Concerned about security? Need support for interactive images including integration with data sets? Want to support multiple languages? Done. Nothing is off the table with this kind of community-driven and -supported infrastructure. (more…)


June 8, 2018

From services to access: Reflections of a first-time Forum attendee

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Editor’s note: This is part of a series of reflections by community members on the recent Library Publishing Forum. See the whole series. This post is guest written by Talea Anderson, Scholarly Communication Librarian at Washington State University and recipient of a Library Publishing Forum First-Time Attendee Scholarship. 

In May I attended my first Library Publishing Forum with support kindly provided by LPC. The conference was filled with meaningful experiences for me. I’d mention in particular the time I was able to spend with the editorial staff of Kairos as part of KairosCamp and the opportunity I had later in the week to participate in the first pilot of the Library Publishing Curriculum. I manage a small, service-focused scholarly communication program at Washington State University, and these two workshops provided a glimpse of the editorial services that help keep journals running. On my campus, we are currently moving forward with supporting faculty who would like to create and publish open educational resources and I came away with a better understanding of the kinds of needs these faculty members may have when it comes to preparing, editing, and publishing their work.

These workshops were a great introduction to editorial work and publishing services, but for me the most meaningful part of LPF came on the first day when Catherine Kudlick spoke about web accessibility (slides coming soon). Kudlick invited us as library publishers to build accessibility into our workflows from the start, and to see this work not as punitive but as a service to all people, including disabled communities. This message is certainly important but I connected to it on an unexpectedly personal level. I learned, on introducing myself to Kudlick after her keynote, that we share the same eye condition and face similar challenges when it comes to doing things like presenting to audiences and reading texts on mobile devices. I rarely encounter others who can relate to the way I see—it’s rarer still to find people in academia who cope with vision loss while engaging with publishing and scholarly communication. The brief chat I had with Kudlick was, to say the least, a special opportunity for me. In the end, thanks in part to this encounter, I came away from LPF feeling inspired to continue improving access to information for everyone, including people like me and Kudlick and many others who benefit from inclusive publishing practices.

Talea Anderson
Scholarly Communication Librarian
Washington State University


June 7, 2018

What do we value in academic ownership?

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Editor’s note: This is part of a series of reflections by community members on the recent Library Publishing Forum and Owned by the Academy: A Preconference on Open Source Publishing Software. See the whole series

When I learned that this year’s Library Publishing Forum preconference was called “Owned by the Academy,” I knew right away that I had to attend. I was just beginning my new job as Scholarly Communications Librarian at West Virginia University, and our Dean had recently mentioned to me the idea of academically-owned publishing. So the preconference presented a perfect opportunity to learn more about an area of interest at my new institution.

I anticipated that I would learn about lots of different open source publishing platforms, and leave the conference better informed to make recommendations as to which of these would be a good fit for my library, and this certainly happened. But since returning from Minneapolis, I’ve also been spending a lot of time reflecting on owned by the academy as a concept, and so I’m going to dedicate this post to sharing some of my thoughts on this issue.

Prior to the preconference, the phrase owned by the academy brought to my mind open source publishing software built and supported by a community of academic librarians, IT and development staff, and academically-oriented non-profits. I imagined that under an “academically-owned” setup, the software and infrastructure would be hosted at the institutional or consortial level and that commercial entities would not have a role to play.

But in light of my experience at the Owned by the Academy Preconference (and the Library Publishing Forum as a whole), I’ve been reconsidering what owned by the academy really means. At the preconference, there were representatives from colleges, universities, and non-profits, but some for-profit businesses were represented as well. So I’ve been thinking a lot about whether for-profit involvement is compatible with academic ownership. (more…)


May 16, 2018

Watch the livestream of the Library Publishing Forum

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For the second time, we will be livestreaming portions of the Library Publishing Forum (5/22-23)! You can see which sessions will be streamed on the Program Page (look for the little camera icon next to the presentation title). All streaming will be done via LPC’s Twitter account and will be shared via the conference hastag: #LPForum18. Can’t watch the stream live? Links to the recordings will be added to the program after the conference.

A BIG “thank you” to our Forum livestreaming volunteers: Lauren Collister (University of Pittsburgh), Sean Crowe (University of Cincinnati), Kevin Hawkins (University of North Texas), and Jody Bailey (University of Texas at Arlington). We couldn’t do it without you!

We will also be streaming the plenary sessions at Owned by the Academy: A Preconference on Open Source Publishing Software, so make sure to tune in on 5/21 starting at 8:30am CDT. Access to the livestream of the preconference will be via LPC’s Twitter account and the preconference hashtag: #OwnedByTheAcademy.


March 29, 2018

AUPresses-LPC Cross-Pollination Program recipients announced

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Association of University Presses logoThis year, LPC collaborated on a Cross-Pollination Conference Registration Waiver program to promote greater interconnectivity between members of the Association of University Presses and the LPC. The program helps two people from each organization’s membership to attend the other’s annual meeting.

Recipients of a waiver to attend the 2018 Library Publishing Forum are: James Ayers, Managing Editor at University of New Mexico Press; and Jana Faust, Manager of Digital Assets and IT at University of Nebraska Press. Recipients of a waiver to attend the 2018 AUPresses Annual Meeting are: Sarah Hare, Scholarly Communication Librarian at Indiana University; and Mark Konecny, Scholarly Communications Publishing Coordinator at the University of Cincinnati.

After attending the meetings, this cohort of 4 cross-pollinators will provide public reports on their experience. In addition to creating collegial networks between the two communities, this program is intended to encourage future collaboration between the two organizations.

Congratulations to these worthy recipients!

The 2018 Library Publishing Forum will be held in Minneapolis, May 21-23.

The 2018 AUPresses Annual Meeting will be held in San Francisco, June 17-19.

 


March 21, 2018

Accessibility F.A.Q.s page for the Library Publishing Forum

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Making the Library Publishing Forum accessible to a diverse group of attendees is a priority for the Library Publishing Coalition and for the Program Committee. Not only do we want the Forum and the library publishing community to benefit from a range of viewpoints and experiences, but we also want to acknowledge the importance of accessibility as a value of library publishing itself. This year’s keynote speaker, Catherine Kudlick, is the Director of the Paul K. Longmore Institute on Disability at San Francisco State University, and we have made accessibility one of the themes of this year’s conference. We are looking forward to some great discussion on and shared strategies for accessible publishing!

While it can be challenging for a small conference to plan for and implement many accessibility measures (like ASL translation), there are lots of things we can do easily – including providing solid information for anyone who is thinking about attending. We can also encourage attendees to let us know as early as possible how we can support their participation, as even more expensive or labor-intensive accommodations may be within reach with enough time to plan! As a small step in this direction, for the first time this year, we have created a page for frequently asked questions (F.A.Q.s) about accessibility related to the Library Publishing Forum, based on SIGACCESS’s Guide to Creating a Conference Accessibility FAQ Page. Topics covered include the venue, the transit options, and the kinds of support available. We welcome feedback and additional questions of all kinds, and look forward to building out the information even further for future Forums!

Read the F.A.Q.s


March 1, 2018

Library Publishing Curriculum pilot workshops at the Forum

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Promotional image for Library Publishing Curriculum pilot workshops

The Developing A Curriculum to Advance Library-Based Publishing project, generously funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services, is hosting a pair of in-person workshops at at this year’s Library Publishing Forum based on the first two modules, Content and Impact. Both will take place on Thursday, May 24 (the day after the Forum) at the University of Minnesota. Each workshop is limited to 20 participants, to be selected through a brief but competitive application process. Each workshop will also include two diversity scholarships for attendees (four scholarships in total). While the workshops are affiliated with and will complement the Library Publishing Forum, please note that you do not have to attend the Forum to participate in the workshops or to receive a scholarship. Learn more about the workshops.

Workshop descriptions

Library Publishing Curriculum: Content

The Content workshop will cover how library publishers attract, select, edit, manage, and disseminate content. Attendees will learn how to recruit partners and select content for their program, and how to incorporate diverse voices into each part of the publication process. The workshop will also share information on common production workflows, identifying the resources and staff skills needed to support various editorial strategies and content types.

Instructors: Joshua Neds-Fox, Wayne State University and Charlotte Roh, University of San Francisco

Library Publishing Curriculum: Impact

The Impact workshop will focus on how library publishers measure and extend the impact of their work. Attendees will learn to identify and apply specific impact measures for publications, to assess the performance of a publishing program and publication portfolio, and to build an engagement strategy and evaluate its effects.

Instructor: Rebecca Welzenbach, University of Michigan

(more…)


February 13, 2018

Library Publishing Forum registration and scholarships

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Registration is now open for the 2018 Library Publishing Forum (May 22-23), Owned by the Academy: A Preconference on Open Source Publishing Platforms (May 21), and the KairosCamp Editors Workshop (May 20-21).

Registration Instructions 

Instructions and fees are detailed on our website. New this year: Special discounted rates for students and attendees from low- and middle-income countries!

First-Time Attendee Scholarships 

The Library Publishing Coalition is delighted to announce a new program of scholarships for first-time attendees, with an emphasis on bringing new and diverse perspectives to the community. Two scholarships are available for 2018, each of which will cover up to $1,000 of registration and travel expenses. The application deadline is March 16th. Learn more.

LPC-AUPresses Cross-Pollination Registration Waivers

The Library Publishing Coalition and the Association of University Presses have teamed up this year to offer four registration waivers to our conferences (two for the Library Publishing Forum and two for the AUPresses Annual Meeting), designed to promote greater interconnectivity between our communities. The application deadline is March 1st. Learn more.

Register for the Forum


November 14, 2017

Publishing platforms preconference: Call for showcase participants!

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Promotional image for preconference

The Library Publishing Coalition seeks participants for a showcase session at the Library Publishing Forum’s preconference on open source publishing platforms (May 21st, 2018) at  Wilson Library at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. The preconference is affiliated with the Library Publishing Forum, which will take place May 22nd and 23rd at the University of Minnesota’s McNamara Alumni Center.

The showcase session will allow attendees to learn more about the broader ecosystem of open source publishing software. We especially invite representation from:

  • Open source platforms used to publish content online
  • Open source tools related to any stage of the publishing process
  • Service providers working with open source software
  • Organizations focused on creating or sustaining open source publishing software

For more information on the preconference and the Library Publishing Forum, see our official call for showcase participants. If you have any questions, please reach out to Melanie Schlosser. Registration for the preconference will open in spring 2018.

We hope to see you in Minneapolis in May!


November 14, 2017

Call for proposals: 2018 Library Publishing Forum

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Library Publishing Forum header image

The Library Publishing Coalition Program Committee is delighted to announce that the call for proposals for the 2018 Library Publishing Forum is now open!

The Program Committee welcomes proposals on any library publishing topic. We particularly invite those that address the following themes:

  • New directions: Share your new initiatives, partnerships, or research, or tackle new challenges in library publishing.
  • Accessibility: Share how your program is working to achieve the broadest possible access to scholarship or explore opportunities for increasing the accessibility of digital publications.
  • Discovery: Share how you are increasing the reach and impact of your publications or propose collaborative solutions to discovery challenges.  

We are accepting proposals for both full sessions (60 minutes, including Q&A) and individual panel slots (~15 minutes).

The deadline for submission is January 19, 2018, and applicants will be notified of their acceptance no later than February 28, 2018.

See the official call for proposals for more information on the Forum, plus instructions on how to submit.

We hope to see you in Minneapolis in May!