LPC Blog

The Library Publishing Coalition Blog is used to share news and updates about the LPC and the Library Publishing Forum, to draw attention to items of interest to the community, and to publish informal commentaries by LPC members and friends.

Promo image for 2019 Forum
January 14, 2019

It’s time to register for the Library Publishing Forum!

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Registration is now open for the Library Publishing Forum and for Opening the Classroom: Publishing Open Educational Resources (preconference).

Library Publishing Forum registration (May 9-10)

More information about registration, including rates and refund policies, can be found on the Registration and Travel page. The registration deadline is April 19th.

Register for the Forum

Preconference registration (May 8)

Don’t miss out on this year’s preconference, Opening the Classroom: Publishing Open Educational Resources, co-sponsored by the Open Textbook Network and BCcampus. You can register for the whole day, or choose to attend just the morning textbook publishing workshop or the afternoon mini-conference. Space is limited for this one (especially the workshop, which is limited to 50 participants), so make sure to register early!

Register for the Preconference

 


LPC logo, quarterly update, image of pen and envelopes
January 10, 2019

LPC Quarterly Update

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Check out our latest Quarterly Update! It includes:

  • New members and a new strategic affiliate
  • Winner of the first annual LPC Award for Exemplary Service
  • Call for nominations for our annual research award
  • LPC/Open Textbook Network webinar exchange
  • Library Publishing Forum
    • Registration coming soon
    • Schedule at-a-glance
    • Travel information
  • Featured resource: New updates to the Library Publishing Bibliography


January 9, 2019

Matt Ruen receives the first annual LPC Award for Exemplary Service

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As participation in library publishing grows, community involvement and leadership has become increasingly important for the profession. To this end, the LPC Board established the LPC Award for Exemplary Service, recognizing substantial contributions by an LPC community member to advancing the mission, vision, and values of the Library Publishing Coalition.

Whimsical headshot of Matt in front of a buildingOn behalf of the LPC Board, we are delighted to announce that the recipient of the 2018 LPC Award for Exemplary Service is Matt Ruen (Grand Valley State University). Matt is being recognized for his dedicated service on the LPC Program Committee, and was praised by committee members as an “excellent listener who leads the group gently toward programmatic, thoughtful action.” In his second consecutive term as committee chair, Matt has guided the Program Committee during a time when the Library Publishing Forum has grown significantly, and has helped to create effective structures for program planning and handling an increasing volume of proposals.

In addition to his work on the Program Committee, Matt served as an instructor for a Library Publishing Curriculum workshop at this year’s Digital Library Federation Forum, educating other librarians about best practices and standards in library publishing.

Matt will receive a complimentary registration to this year’s Library Publishing Forum, a $50 gift card, and he will be recognized at the Forum.


January 9, 2019

January is Shared Documentation Month for the LPC

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One of LPC’s most important member resources is the Shared Documentation portal, which allows members to build on each other’s work by sharing policies, procedures, MOUs, position descriptions, and other internal documentation that’s produced by library publishing organizations. To increase awareness and facilitate use of the shared documentation, this January will be our first-ever Shared Documentation Month! If you’re at a member institution, keep an eye on the list each Wednesday this month for a message where we highlight a shared document and provide tools and resources to support use of the Shared Documentation.

Not at a member institution? Consider LPC membership for your library!

LPC Publishers & Service Providers


January 9, 2019

LPC welcomes a new strategic affiliate: Creative Commons USA

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Creative Commons USA logo

The Library Publishing Coalition is delighted to welcome Creative Commons USA (CC USA) as a new strategic affiliate! A statement from CC USA:

“Creative Commons USA is excited to announce that we have become a Strategic Affiliate of the Library Publishing Coalition. LPC is doing great work coordinating key stakeholders in the publishing of educational and scholarly works – and we hope our partnership will support their goal of creating a more open publishing ecosystem. As stewards of one of the most common open licenses, Creative Commons USA is committed to providing expert support and professional development opportunities around copyright and licensing.”

And a statement from LPC on the new relationship:

“Open licensing is an important tool for library publishers as they look to increase the reach and impact of the scholarship they publish. Creative Commons USA has already been a valuable partner for the Library Publishing Coalition as we support the community in this work, and our members continue to benefit from CC USA’s deep expertise on copyright and licensing. We look forward to deepening our partnership around professional development and to advancing our shared values.”

Strategic affiliates are peer membership associations who have a focal area in scholarly communications and substantial engagement with libraries, publishers, or both. See our list of strategic affiliates or learn more about the program.

LPC Strategic Affiliates icon


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January 8, 2019

Announcing the 2019 Library Publishing Forum keynote speaker: Dr. Arianna Becerril-García

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The Library Publishing Coalition Program Committee is delighted to announce that the 2019 Library Publishing Forum keynote address will be presented by Dr. Arianna Becerril-García, co-founder and Executive Director of Redalyc (the Network of Scientific Journals from Latin America, the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal).  

Photo of Dr. Arianna Becerril-GarciaIn addition to Redalyc, Dr. Becerril-García co-founded the Mexican Network of Institutional Repositories (REMERI), and founded AmeliCA, a community-driven initiative for Open Knowledge in Latin America and the Global South. As a professor at the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico, her research areas include open access, interoperability, linked data, and the semantic web.  Recent works include The End of a Centralized Open Access Project and the Beginning of a Community-Based Sustainable Infrastructure for Latin America: Redalyc.org after Fifteen Years The Open Access ecosystem in Latin America, and A Semantic Model for Selective Knowledge Discovery over OAI-PMH Structured Resources.

We are particularly excited to learn from Dr. Becerril-García’s expertise and experience building successful, sustainable, community-based scholarly publishing.

Redlayc and other Latin American initiatives are leaders in this area, and their successes and challenges are highly relevant for ongoing U.S. and Canadian discussions about academy owned infrastructure (like last year’s Owned by the Academy preconference).  


Registration for the Library Publishing Forum will open on January 14, 2019. Travel and hotel information is currently available.


January 3, 2019

LPC is hiring!

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To support our growing community of members and expanding roster of projects and programs, LPC is hiring our first-ever Program Assistant.

This 20 hr/wk position will provide support for administration, communications, event planning, research, and more. As an affiliated community of the Educopia Institute, LPC’s staff are employed by Educopia, and work remotely as part of Educopia’s virtual office. If you have strong administrative and communication skills, love library publishing, and are interested in supporting this amazing community, this may be the job for you!  The position is open until filled, but priority will be given to applications received by January 25th.

Check out the full job posting.


December 19, 2018

CFP open for IFLA midterm meeting on library publishing

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Library publishers around the world (but especially in western Europe), check out this call for proposals! The new IFLA Special Interest Group (SIG) on Library Publishing is sponsoring a mid-term event in Dublin, Ireland in February, hosted by LPC member Dublin Business School. Please note that proposals are due by January 15th!

International Federation of Library Associations logo

IFLA Special Interest Group (SIG) on Library Publishing
2019 Midterm Meeting

Thursday February 28th – Friday March 1st 2019
Dublin Business School, Dublin, Ireland

Call for Participation

THEME:  Mentoring and Education for Excellence in Library Publishing: An International Knowledge Exchange

Aim

Library publishing (including new-model university presses housed in libraries) is in its infancy in many countries around the world.  The IFLA SIG aims to bring together experienced practitioners and would-be publishers to share information and advance this exciting field of endeavor. New and emerging library publishers will gain insight into the experiences and practices of established presses, and all attendees will learn from new and innovative approaches. The presentations from both sides and the ensuing discussions will advance the excellence and sustainability of library publishing ventures

The aim of the event is to bring together a broad spectrum of publishing programs, to exchange knowledge, and to foster networks and mentoring relationships among library publishers at all stages, also highlighting the important role that the Library Publishing Coalition plays in this regard.

The SIG meeting also invites participation by library schools and others engaged in efforts to educate the next generation of library publishers.  (more…)


December 13, 2018

LPC/Open Textbook Network webinar exchange

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To lead into our joint preconference to the Library Publishing Forum (Opening the Classroom: Publishing Open Educational Resources, 5/8/19), the Library Publishing Coalition and the Open Textbook Network are organizing a webinar “exchange”! LPC is hosting a webinar for its members on the OTN’s Publishing Cooperative, and OTN is holding a series of three webinars for its membership on OER publishing from a strategic perspective. As part of the exchange, members of both communities are invited to attend all four webinars!

LPC webinar

Figuring it out together: Building foundational knowledge for OER publishing

Date: February 6th, 2pm Eastern/11am Pacific
Presenters: Karen Lauritsen, managing director, Open Textbook Network; Karen Bjork, head of digital initiatives at Portland State University; Carla Myers, assistant librarian and coordinator of scholarly communications for the Miami University Libraries

Details

OTN webinar series: Building an open textbook publishing program

Should you publish?

Date: January 23rd, 2pm Eastern/11am Pacific
Presenter: John W. Warren, George Washington University

How should you publish?

Date: February 20th, 3pm Eastern/12pm Pacific
Presenter: Kevin Hawkins, University of North Texas

Implementing a publishing program

Date: March 14th, 2pm Eastern/11am Pacific
Presenter: Inba Kehoe, University of Victoria

Details


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December 12, 2018

Nominations are open for the 2019 research award!

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‘Tis the season…to nominate yourself or a colleague for the 2019 LPC Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Library Publishing! LPC’s Research Committee is accepting nominations for the award until January 25th. Nominated publications must present original research, theory, or practice, and must have been published during the 2018 calendar year. One change for this year: the committee has broadened the definition of “scholarship” used for the program to include transformative work that isn’t published in a traditional, peer-reviewed format. Learn more and nominate a publication!

Call for Nominations


Water with the word reflections in all caps with a horizontal line above and below
November 29, 2018

The state of the field: An excerpt from the 2019 Library Publishing Directory

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As much as we love the searchable online interface for the Library Publishing Directory, it doesn’t include the introduction found in the print, PDF, and EPUB versions. Each year, the Directory‘s introduction includes a ‘state of the field’ based on that year’s data that highlights trends and new developments in library publishing as reported by the programs that contribute their information. To make it easier to find, we are republishing that portion of the introduction here. This year’s introduction was written by Alexandra Hoff, Jessica Kirschner, Janet Swatscheno, and Robert Browder, with an assist from me. Enjoy!

MOVING FORWARD, LOOKING OUTWARD

LOCAL AND EXTERNAL PARTNERSHIPS

Local partnerships remain a mainstay of library publishing, and this is reflected in the 2019 dataset. Most library publishers report partnering with campus departments (80%) and individual faculty (78%). Many also partner with
graduate students (57%) and undergraduate students (57%). A minority of library publishers partner with the university press (29%).

While library publishers continue to focus on campus stakeholders through faculty-driven and student-driven journals, this year’s responses indicated a significant increase in the number of journals published for external groups. The number of faculty-driven journals increased 16% (442 to 512) from the previous year, and the number of student-driven journals increased 31% (224 to 294), while journals published for external groups increased 50% (173 to 259). It is possible that the increase in journals published for outside groups is part of a larger trend in library publishing, or it may reflect more specifically the publishing approaches of the many new entries in this year’s Directory. (more…)


Library Publishing Directory 2019 now available
November 29, 2018

Now available: This year’s Library Publishing Directory

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The Library Publishing Coalition is pleased to announce publication of the 2019 Library Publishing Directory! This year’s Library Publishing Directory highlights the publishing activities of 138 academic and research libraries, and is openly available in PDF and EPUB formats and via the searchable online directory. The Directory illustrates the many ways in which libraries are actively transforming and advancing scholarly communications in partnership with scholars, students, university presses, and others. Each year, the Directory‘s introduction presents a ‘state of the field’ based on that year’s data. 

Publication of the 2019 Directory was overseen by the LPC’s Directory Committee:

  • Alexandra Hoff, Purdue University (2018-19 chair)
  • Robert Browder, Virginia Tech
  • Janet Swatscheno, University of Illinois
  • Jessica Kirschner, Texas Tech
  • Melanie Schlosser, Educopia Institute (ex officio)

The Directory is made possible by the generous donation of services from Purdue University Libraries and Bookmasters.


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October 23, 2018

Save the date: 2019 Library Publishing Forum preconference on publishing OERs

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Mark your calendar – on Wednesday, May 8, 2019, join us in Vancouver, BC for Opening the Classroom: Publishing Open Educational Resources, cosponsored by BCcampus and Open Textbook Network. As the use of OERs continues to grow throughout the academy, this preconference will address the growing need for distinctive practices for developing, supporting, and hosting OERs as part of library publishing. The morning will consist of a hands-on textbook publishing workshop, and the afternoon will include panels and presentations. Visit the event page to learn more, and keep an eye out for more information!


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October 12, 2018

Now open: Call for proposals for the 2019 Library Publishing Forum!

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Have a cool project happening at your library? Mulling over a big topic? Want an excuse to collaborate with peers in the library publishing world? You’re in luck – the call for proposals for the 2019 Library Publishing Forum is now open! As we did for the 2018 Forum, we are accepting proposals for two different types of sessions: individual presentations (15 minutes) and full sessions (60 minutes). Individual presentations are a great opportunity to showcase a project, a workflow, an in-progress program or research project, etc. Full sessions will dig a little deeper, with multi-institution presentations or interactive formats.

While we don’t have a formal conference theme, we do have a set of mini-themes and topic suggestions, inspired by LPC’s new strategic plan:

  • Proposals that consider and promote discussions of diversity and inclusion
  • Case studies that highlight new initiatives, partnerships, or research
  • Sessions that focus on professional development and shared best practices
  • Sessions that envision the library publishing community working together (or joining forces with others) to tackle challenges at scale
  • Sessions exploring the role of library publishing in the bigger context of scholarly communication

Proposals are due November 30, so put your thinking cap on! For more information, view the full call for proposals. If you’re ready to submit, head on over to the submission form:

Submit a Proposal


October 4, 2018

LPC joins the Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion in Scholarly Communication (C4DISC)

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The LPC is proud to be a founding member of the new Coalition for Diversity & Inclusion in Scholarly Communications, or C4DISC. We join nine other professional associations in the scholarly publishing sphere in releasing a Joint Statement of Principles to demonstrate the commitment of participating organizations to promoting involvement, innovation, and expanded access to leadership opportunities that maximize engagement across identity groups and professional levels.

The other founding members of C4DISC are the Association of University Presses, Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers, Canadian Association of Learned Journals, Council of Science Editors, International Society of Managing and Technical EditorsNASIG, Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association, UKSG, and the Society for Scholarly Publishing.

AUPresses, NASIG, OASPA, and SSP are also LPC strategic affiliates, and we are excited to have this opportunity to work together in a new way to advance our shared values. Stay tuned for more information on LPC’s involvement in C4DISC!

Logos of participating organizations

Read the full press release.


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September 11, 2018

Q&A about Ubiquity Press’ new Customer Charter

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The library publishing community was reminded last summer of an ever-present danger: that the commercial tools we rely on will be acquired by companies that don’t share the core values of librarianship. While building our own tools is always an option, there is also room for the commercial organizations we partner with to develop governance structures to protect their customers in the case of an acquisition. LPC sponsor Ubiquity Press recently released a Customer Charter and Partner Advisory Board that are meant to do just this. I asked Ubiquity Community Manager Chealsye Bowley to answer a few questions about them, and her responses are below. I’ve also included a bonus question and answer from Ubiquity Partner Advisory Board member Peter Potter, Virginia Tech’s voting representative to the LPC and Program Committee member. Thanks, Chealsye and Peter!

Q&A with Chealsye Bowley (Ubiquity Press)

What are the values embedded in the charter? 

The customer charter reflects the values of the Open community – immediately available CC-BY open access, use and development of open source tools, and transparency. We wanted to codify our business practices through this charter. Ubiquity is committed to remaining open access, open source, and never exclusively bundling our products.

How was it created?

The customer charter was drafted by our CEO Brian Hole and the company’s Board to reflect discussions we had with our Ubiquity presses, librarians, and the larger Open community in 2018. We wanted to establish this governance to formalize our commitment to the values of the Open community, better protect customer interests, and to respond to general calls from the community for greater transparency by service providers.

How will the new Partner Advisory Board work? What kind of influence or authority will it have around the organization’s adherence to the charter?

The Partner Advisory Board will provide advice on strategic decisions, and guide our adherence to the customer charter. There is a minimum of 3 members and a maximum of 9 members. The initial Partner Advisory Board members were selected to best represent Ubiquity’s existing partners, and includes Gali Halevi, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; Andrew Lockett, University of Westminster; Nirmala Menon, IIT Indore; Peter Potter, Virginia Tech (Chair); and Wilhelm Widmark, Stockholm University Library. Ubiquity is represented by CEO Brian Hole and COO Tom Mowlan.

The Partner Advisory Board will have at least two meetings per year with additional meetings being held as necessary. Meeting minutes will be made publicly available. The full terms of the Partner Advisory Board are detailed in this document available through the Ubiquity website.

One of the goals of the charter is to assure customers that the values that currently guide Ubiquity will continue to be prioritized in the event of an acquisition. How will the charter accomplish this? 

If a sale that would change the majority shareholder is being considered, the Partner Advisory Board would be informed and the proposed majority shareholder would need to commit to continue conducting business in accordance to the Customer Charter for at least 5 years. If the Partner Advisory Board advises not to move forward with the sale on the grounds that no sufficient commitment has been made, Ubiquity will not proceed.

What else would you want library publishers to know about these new developments? 

The customer charter and new Partner Advisory Board are just our first steps. We want to keep engaging with the community and building on this governance. One example of this is an extended commitment to not only use open source software per the charter, but to actively contribute code and support the communities that produce it. This is exemplified in new collaborative relationships with the PKP and Samvera communities in North America, and our ongoing production of open source tools with the OPERAS consortium in Europe. If any library publishers have questions, feedback, or suggestions, we’d love to hear it!

Other questions? Email Chealsye at chealsye.bowley@ubiquitypress.com.

Q&A with Peter Potter (Virginia Tech)

What do you see as the value of the Advisory Board for the members of the Ubiquity Partner Network? 

At a time when the library publishing community is grappling with a host of new open-source publishing tools and platforms, it is wonderful to see Ubiquity committing to open-source in such a public and transparent way. I was delighted when Ubiquity released its new charter and I welcomed the opportunity to serve on the Advisory Board because I see in it a unique opportunity to contribute to shaping the future of the Ubiquity Partner Network.


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September 6, 2018

One library’s scholar-led, scholar-owned manifesto

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This is an invited guest post by Paige Mann at the University of Redlands. 

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“As we expand the footprint of library publishing, we must continue to dialogue with colleagues about the increasing corporatization of academic libraries, and how scholar-led and/or scholar-owned is necessary for the good of our institutions, researchers, students, mainstream and marginalized communities.”

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Building off a shared value for critical librarianship, the librarians at the University of Redlands have been adapting our practices to respond to a myriad of factors, including shrinking budgets, vendor mergers and acquisitions, and publisher transformations into information analytic businesses. Although ours is a private, liberal arts institution that prioritizes teaching over publishing, all of higher education is involved with scholarship and learning, and are thus all affected by and affect scholarly publishing. Given our professional values, library publishers and libraries as a whole must use our positions to discern and respond to practices that erode, or can otherwise weaken, scholarship and learning.

When considering third-party commitments, our practice at the Armacost Library has been to base decisions primarily on costs, features, demand, usage, and influences on student learning. However, since January 2018 our library has been discussing the role professional values play in these decisions. We created a flexible assessment to foreground these values. This assessment takes into account community governance, fair licensing practices, diversity and inclusivity, commitment to open, privacy, and other criteria. Recognizing the impact this could have on institutional relationships, we followed this with a manifesto to draw attention to perversions we observed in scholarly communication practices. Our current draft of the Scholar-Led, Scholar-Owned Manifesto is brief, but dense with citations to strengthen our stance.

As we expand the footprint of library publishing, we must continue to dialogue with colleagues about the increasing corporatization of academic libraries, and how scholar-led and/or scholar-owned is necessary for the good of our institutions, researchers, students, mainstream and marginalized communities. That is, let’s adapt our ethical framework for publishing to also ground the terms with which we negotiate with vendors regarding our repositories, subscriptions, purchases, systems, and services. Let’s also reexamine ways to better steward the resources under our care to balance immediate needs with long-term, sustainable scholarly infrastructures. I’d like to see our scholarly communication units lead this change alongside our reference and user services, technical services, special collections, information literacy, web and technology teams.

The Manifesto will likely remain in draft form for a while as we negotiate with colleagues and ourselves, and while we reconcile the philosophical with the practical world of time, budgetary, and enrollment pressures. With the understanding that this is a big, complex, and ongoing adventure, we are pacing ourselves and will do what we can, with what we have, to work toward sustainable change in libraries. To that end, we encourage you to use and adapt the Assessment and Manifesto documents to stimulate discussion and change at your institutions.

Paige Mann
Physical Sciences Librarian | Web Experiences Librarian
University of Redlands


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August 31, 2018

Building alliances: AUPresses/LPC collaborations and synergies

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For our 2018 conferences, the Library Publishing Coalition and the Association of University Presses collaborated on a Cross-Pollination Registration Waiver Program. The program sent two AUPresses members to the Library Publishing Forum and two LPC members to the AUPresses Annual Meeting. Each of the recipients was asked to write a reflection on their experience and on opportunities for libraries and presses to work together towards our shared goals. This post is by Mark Konecny, University of Cincinnati.  Read the whole series.

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“The imprimatur of a university press—with the scholarly apparatus of peer review and reputation for quality—makes it possible for digital projects to gain the legitimacy demanded by the academic community. Library publishing provides stable preservation and staffing that keeps projects viable for the long run.”

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In 2017, the University of Cincinnati Libraries opened a press with a library publishing unit (CLIPS) in order to provide professional publishing services to faculty, staff, departments, and centers associated with the university. We offer scholarly communications expertise along with à la carte or comprehensive solutions using press partners and staff. Library publishing has been identified as a key element in promoting the intellectual commons model. In keeping with the goals of the library and the university, CLIPS is tasked with developing new modes of digital publishing. The annual meetings of the Association of University Presses and the Library Publishing Forum are opportunities to meet with others working in this field, learn about strategies and techniques utilized by other presses, and pursue opportunities to work with colleagues at other institutions with similar resources. Given the fact that our press is a start-up, I was able to benefit from presentations and consultations with colleagues from universities around the world.

At the AUPresses meeting, I concentrated my efforts in three specific areas of interest: sustainable infrastructure, publishing digital projects, and workflows for the use of digital publishing platforms. One of the biggest challenges for a small unit is making sure that resources are used wisely and provide a service that can be used across the university. It became clear through discussions that this is a shared concern for all library publishers, and the meeting allowed me to understand how university presses create workflows to increase efficiency and leverage outsourcing. I was surprised by the profusion of publishing platforms being developed by university presses: Editoria, Vega, PubPub, Manifold, Fulcrum, OJS, and others. Even more remarkable is the variety of strategies these platforms use to produce output. Many attendees voiced a concern that technology was being promoted at the expense of producing quality output. There is a significant danger in allowing the technological tail to wag the dog, squandering scarce resources for small reward. This insight into process provided me with a cautionary tale and a better understanding of the status of different projects. (more…)


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August 30, 2018

Variety and values: Reflections on the Library Publishing Forum

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For our 2018 conferences, the Library Publishing Coalition and the Association of University Presses collaborated on a Cross-Pollination Registration Waiver Program. The program sent two AUPresses members to the Library Publishing Forum and two LPC members to the AUPresses Annual Meeting. Each of the recipients was asked to write a reflection on their experience and on opportunities for libraries and presses to work together towards our shared goals. This post is by Jana Faust, University of Nebraska Press.  Read the whole series

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“A couple of things that stood out to me at the conference were individuals’ passion for their work and their commitment to a set of values that would create a culture of inclusivity.”

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The University of Nebraska Press and University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries often collaborate but they continue to be separate units of the university. It is most common for UNP to work with the UNL Libraries’ Center for Digital Research in the Humanities (specific examples include the Willa Cather Archive and The Journals of the Lewis & Clark Expedition Online), Archives and Special Collections, and the institutional repository.

I went into the Library Publishing Forum not knowing very much about the more recent models of library publishing programs except that it has become more common for institutions to merge what had traditionally been two separate programs. I hoped to learn more about the purpose of these new models and how they differ from more traditional publishing. One thing that became apparent immediately is that there is as much variety in library publishing (in size, output, and workflow) as there is in university press publishing.

A couple of things that stood out to me at the conference were individuals’ passion for their work and their commitment to a set of values that would create a culture of inclusivity. In order to create the desired culture, many of these programs started by determining their values and then used those values as the foundation of their publishing programs. I would have expected the planning stage to focus more on practical issues: what types of content or subject areas to publish, how to handle peer review, and so forth. Instead, they often first documented their commitment to a culture of diversity, inclusivity, accessibility, and equity. I found the keynote by Cathy Kudlick, professor of history and director of the Paul K. Longmore Institute on Disability at San Francisco State University, particularly enlightening. She urged attendees to “see disability as a tool for thinking differently about the world,” to picture pirates as disability action figures, and to go beyond compliance. In addition, she described people with disabilities as being the world’s best problem solvers. (more…)