Past Forum Info

May 11, 2022

Labor Panel

Pittsburgh has a long, fraught labor history with recent revitalization that has impacted our library community. Four local experts who have worked on labor issues in libraries will gather on stage to share their views and experiences, touching on major subjects like vocational awe, invisible labor, and collective action. These issues resonate with library publishing workers across institutions and contexts; we will explore what we in the library publishing community can learn from organized labor and inspire each other to work collectively to effect change in our discipline, and to look to each other for support and solidarity.


May 10, 2022

Keynote: Janne Pölönen

Helsinki Initiative of Multilingualism in Scholarly Communication

Janne Pölönen

The Helsinki Initiative on Multilingualism in Scholarly Communication (www.helsinki-initiative.org) was launched in 2019 to foster an environment that values multilingual scholarly communication, science communication and open access to scholarly publications in all languages. The Initiative has three main goals:

  1. to promote multilingual dissemination of research knowledge withing and beyond academia
  2. to ensure sustainable open access transition of non-profit scholarly publishers who make publishing in different languages possible
  3. to promote language diversity and multilingualism in research assessment and funding systems

In this talk I will discuss different approaches to multilingualism and go through some of its main challenges. I will specifically explore how multilingual scientific knowledge benefits of science and society, why we need to protect national language journals and book publishers – the very infrastructure making multilingual publishing possible, and why it is important to recognize and reward high quality research published and communicated in all languages.

It is important to communicate research results to international expert audiences according to the best practices and traditions of each discipline. However, if research is communicated exclusively in English, academia risks not fully meeting all its missions and responsibilities toward society. In addition to international excellence, science policy calls for Responsible Research and Innovation and Open Science. Broad access to scientific knowledge and interaction between science and society is possible only if research is communicated and used in multiple languages.

The application of globally and locally produced knowledge requires critical discussion and dialogue between the scientific community familiar with the local conditions and different actors within society. The COVID-19 pandemic saw a widespread need for multilingual communication, not only between researchers, but also to reach decision-makers, professionals and citizens. To cope with grand challenges and to meet sustainable development goals, we need both globalized and localized research communicated in languages and formats suited for the diverse audiences.

Especially in the social sciences and humanities, important part of research is contextualised, creating a need for original research in the main languages of researchers and citizens who are affected by this research. A study of users of open access journals on the Finnish Journal.fi platform shows that articles in national languages (in this case Finnish and Swedish) are vital for reaching important users of research both within and beyond academia.

The national journals and book publishers across Europe play a vital role in the scholarly ecosystem by providing to the research communities outlets for publishing and critically discussing research results in researchers’ and citizens’ main languages. Peer-reviewed journals and books are mainly published in the local languages by small-scale non-profit publishers such as learned societies or research institutions, relying on voluntary work.

Translation services based on artificial intelligence technologies are part of the solution for facilitating multilingual access to scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, action plan to promote and implement multilingualism needs also to address how to secure a sustainable open access transition of journals publishing locally relevant research and developing scientific terminology in the different languages.

Because assessments steer research through distribution of resources, rewards, and merits, language biases in assessment can compromise equal opportunities for individual researchers and institutions. Intended or unintended language priorities in assessment may lead to systemic undervaluation of SSH research compared to STEM fields in funding, and endanger locally relevant research and knowledge transfer beyond academia.

Ideally, language is a non-issue in assessment. In practice, assessment criteria and methods are often far from language-neutral, and this is an issue with research metrics as well as expert-assessment. Researchers should be able to trust that high-quality research is valued regardless of publishing languages, and that they can make a career and have funding even if they spend time on writing to policy-makers, professionals or general public, or act as editors or reviewers for local language journals.

The long-term goal of the Helsinki Initiative is to ensure the continued availability and vitality of high-quality research published in all languages needed across the world for effective communication of research knowledge within and beyond academia.

References:

Helsinki Initiative on Multilingualism in Scholarly Communication (2019). Helsinki: Federation of Finnish Learned Societies, Committee for Public Information, Finnish Association for Scholarly Publishing, Universities Norway & European Network for Research Evaluation in the Social Sciences and the Humanities. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7887059

Kulczycki, E., Engels, T. & Pölönen, J. (2022). Multilingualism of social sciences. In Engels, T. & Kulczycki, E. (eds.), Handbook on research assessment in the social sciences, Edward Elgar Publishing, 350-366. https://doi.org/10.4337/9781800372559.00031

Pölönen, J., Kulczycki, E., Mustajoki, H. & Røeggen, V. (2021). Multilingualism is integral to accessibility and should be part of European research assessment reform. LSE Impact Blog, December 7th, 2021. https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2021/12/07/multilingualism-is-integral-to-accessibility-and-should-be-part-of-european-research-assessment-reform/

Pölönen, J., Syrjämäki, S., Nygård, A.-J. & Hammarfelt, B. (2021). Who Are the Users of National Open Access Journals? The case of Finnish Journal.fi platform. Learned Publishing, 34(4), 585-592. https://doi.org/10.1002/leap.1405

 


March 10, 2022

Plenary: NGLP: Building in the Open, Building Together

Day/Time: Thursday, May 26,  4:00pm – 5:00pm

Presenters

  • Katherine Skinner, NGLP
  • Dave Pcolar, NGLP
  • Kate Herman, NGLP

Description

Now in its third year, The Next Generation Library Publishing (NGLP) project has completed the first phase of development of its two open source components and has implemented those components in a series of pilots and projects that demonstrate the modularity and interoperability of NGLP’s approach to addressing gaps in current open source infrastructure for library publishing.

As NGLP shifts to piloting new service models via our project partners (California Digital Library, Janeway, and Longleaf Services), we return to why we chose to build modular, content-agnostic components to address community-identified gaps in the library publishing ecosystem. NGLP Product Manager, Dave Pcolar, will discuss the guiding principles of the development phase: building for flexibility and scalability with a diverse set of publishing needs in mind. NGLP co-principal investigator Katherine Skinner will then report on the ongoing work of developing a business framework to support this and similar projects that seek to build service layers on top of widely-adopted and trusted open-source platforms like OJS, Janeway, and DSpace, and explore how values-aligned service providers might better support the underlying technologies that provide the backbone for their service provision. In folding these two conversations together, this presentation will highlight not only what NGLP has accomplished in the past two years, but what it was built for: securing more robust, sustainable, and values-driven infrastructure for library publishers.


March 10, 2022

Panel: PT2-230

Day/Time: Thursday, May 26, 2:30pm – 3:30pm


Making Open Access Books Work: A Library-Press Partnership Perspective

Presenters

  • Emma Vecellio, Library Relations Manager, Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library

Description

With the amount of open scholarly publications increasing, it is critical to understand the infrastructure supporting the dissemination and ingestion of open access monographs in particular. The University of Michigan Library and University of Michigan Press have been working to establish better discovery of open content with partner libraries as the press continues to develop its Fund to Mission open access monograph model. This session will provide an overview of the workflows around open content using the University of Michigan as an example and will reflect on best practices and takeaways for attendees.


The Challenge of Disseminating Metadata on Library Published, Open-Access Books

Presenters

  • Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei, co-director, punctum books; COPIM (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs)

Description

This presentation will delve into the challenges open-access book publishers face with the current metadata supply chain, as well as attempts to address these challenges. It uses the case of Thoth, an open-metadata dissemination service currently under development as part of the Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM) project, to discuss some of the strategies scholar-led publishers and university presses are devising to amplify the discoverability of their books. Open access disrupts established book distribution channels because of its (1) orientation away from a sales process measured by units sold or licensed, (2) need for different kinds of metadata such as DOIs, which have yet to be implemented consistently across the supply chain, and (3) the emergence of a large number of new open-access content platforms that require a variety of metadata formats for deposit. Library publishers who seek to widen the discoverability of their books need to know about the current state and direction of the book supply chain, metadata standards used beyond the library, and workflows bottlenecks when working with data intermediaries. The goal of the presentation is first, to help library publishers learn more about the book metadata supply chain, and second, to prompt a discussion of whether emerging data intermediaries are adequately addressing the specific needs of library publishers.


March 10, 2022

Panel: PT-230

Day/Time: Thursday, May 26, 2:30pm – 3:30pm


Student Journal Forum: From a local event to a Canada-wide movement

Presenters

  • Mariya Maistrovskaya, University of Toronto Libraries
  • Sarah Severson, University of Alberta Library

Description

Student Journal Forum started as an in-person half-day event at the University of Toronto in 2015. It was piloted by a cross-departmental group of librarians who came together to help connect a diverse group of student editors to publishing resources, best practices and to each other.

Seven years later, this annual event has grown into a Canada-wide virtual gathering. The shift to online during the COVID-19 pandemic was a key catalyst to open up the forum to students to connect remotely, and for the event to be jointly organized by multiple libraries across Canada.

The nature of the Forum has evolved as well. From its inaugural focus on the delivery of faculty and librarian-led lecture-style literacy sessions to students, it moved to student-centred, peer-led and participatory learning sessions. In 2022, for the first time, the Forum featured an open Call for Proposals to let students take the lead on the content they wanted to talk about.

Finally, the Forum helped establish and strengthen the connections between different Canadian libraries that offer student journal publishing support. This network continues to operate throughout the year, beyond the annual event, in the form of offering open virtual workshops for student editors and sharing useful publishing resources. In this presentation, we will reflect on the evolution of the Student Journal Forum, its successes and challenges, and explore potential future directions in which libraries could support student journal publishing.


Using Open Access Publishing to Promote Undergraduate Research

Presenters

  • Brett Say, Director of Honor Research Programs, University of Pittsburgh Honors College
  • Angel Zheng, Undergraduate Student, University of Pittsburgh Honors College
  • Corey Schultz, Undergraduate Student, University of Pittsburgh Honors College
  • Samantha Kirschman, Undergraduate Student, University of Pittsburgh Honors College

Description

This presentation provides a case study, from an academic department’s perspective, that details how university libraries can help departments develop training programs and interdisciplinary policies that support the development of undergraduate student journals. The Pittsburgh Undergraduate Review (PUR) provides undergraduate students an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed, online forum to publish research and creative scholarship. Sponsored by the University Honors College, and supported by the University of Pittsburgh’s open access journal publishing program, the PUR strives to build an integrative community of undergraduate scholars and showcase student work done under the mentorship of faculty mentors.

Since university libraries often have access to systems and resources academic departments do not, as well as a strong knowledge of these systems, this presentation will outline the ways university libraries can provide unique value to academic departments that want to develop open access student journals. The presentation outlines three distinguishing features university libraries can consider when helping departments develop undergraduate journals – An interdisciplinary knowledge of publishing standards, a student peer review training process, and centralized support structure for journal administration.

The presentation utilizes the PUR journal as a case study for developing a new journal or expanding an established student journal. A history of the library and Honors College collaboration is outlined, and presenters will provide advice on potential obstacles libraries and academic departments might face when trying to establish a similar and provide a suggested outline for journal policy development.


March 10, 2022

Full Session: Maturing Our Program: Criteria for Selection, Content Advisories, and Celebrating Great Work

Day/Time: Thursday, May 26,  11:30am – 12:30pm

Presenters

  • Laurie Taylor, University of Florida
  • Perry Collins, University of Florida
  • Chelsea Johnston, University of Florida
  • Tracy MacKay-Ratliff, University of Florida

Description

The LibraryPress@UF started in 2016. Since then, we have been working to mature our program and publish. In 2021, we are set to release a dozen publications (books in print and online, textbooks, and digital scholarship),i in addition to our 20 continuously publishing journals. We follow feminist situated perspective and grounded theory, working to mature program supports through evidence-based and experience-based practices to develop right-sized program operations that best support us and our readers, users, and authors/editors/creators. In following this approach, we often release program supports at the point of need. In this presentation, we will share stories on those points of need and the results, which include:

  • An updated selection criteria, to explicitly prioritize works that promote inclusion and justice by highlighting overlooked or marginalized experiences and perspectives
  • A name change policy, implemented for our publications and for theses and dissertations at UF
  • Our first content advisory, and how we came to publish a book (even as digital-only) that required one
  • Our books this year, and what each has taught us about publishing, including African American Studies: 50 Years at the University of Florida and Delivering Cuba through the Mail: Cuba’s Presence in Non-Cuban Postage Stamps and Envelopes

In sharing our stories as mini-cases of our collective stories of library publishing, we seek to enable more rapid and easier maturation for others. We also seek to inspire with stories specifically from African American Studies: 50 Years at the University of Florida.


March 10, 2022

Full Session: Stepping Onto the Platform: Reflections on Michigan Publishing’s Switch to Janeway for OA Journal Publishing

Day/Time: Thursday, May 26,  11:30am – 12:30pm

Presenters

  • Andy Byers, Senior Publishing Technologies Developer, Birkbeck, University of London/Open Library of Humanities
  • Jason Colman, Director, Michigan Publishing Services, University of Michigan Library
  • Mauro Sanchez, Senior Publishing Technologies Developer, Birkbeck, University of London/Open Library of Humanities
  • Lauren Stachew, Senior Digital Publishing Coordinator, Michigan Publishing Services, University of Michigan Library

Description

Michigan Publishing has been publishing open access journals on a home-grown platform called DLXS since the early 2000s. For the last year and a half, Michigan has been in the process of switching its roughly 40 journals from DLXS to Janeway, the open source journals platform developed by a team at the Centre for Technology and Publishing at Birkbeck, University of London. In this presentation, members of the Janeway and Michigan teams will reflect on why we decided to work together, what the partnership has brought for each of us, and how the transition has gone from both technical and editorial points of view. We’ll include a timeline of the steps we took to accomplish it, and the roles that were involved on both teams.

We’ll try to offer some practical takeaways on best practices for other library journal publishers who are thinking about switching to a new platform, and invite discussion with others in our community who have made or are thinking of making similar moves.


March 10, 2022

Full Session: Discussion of University-based Publishing Infrastructure Virtual Convening

Day/Time: Thursday, May 26,  10:15am – 11:15am

Presenters

  • Ally Laird, Penn State University
  • Melanie Schlosser, Community Facilitator, LPC (Educopia)

Description

Members of the Library Publishing Coalition, the Association of University Presses (AUPresses) and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) will be hosting and planning a series of sessions both within and across communities over the first half of 2022, culminating in a small convening of representatives from the three groups on the topic of “University-based Publishing Infrastructure” in July 2022. This convening is meant to highlight the values and goals around shared and open infrastructure, advancing equity in scholarly communication, increasing efficiencies in services, and sustainability in university-based publishing. To prepare for this small convening, each community will host a community discussion and then a series of three small focus groups which will pull representatives from each group to participate in facilitated discussions. The goals of the convening are to identify the goals/values/needs to advocate on behalf of university-based publishing and to establish a shared definition of university-based publishing between the LPC, AUPresses, and ARL.

This session, hosted by the LPC Board, would pull together the community in a discussion around the outcomes of these community meetings and focus groups. Attendees will be invited to provide input on discussion questions addressing the importance of library publishing, the values that underpin library publishing, and how University Presses and library publishers are similar, among other questions. They will also be asked to provide feedback on materials pulled together from the previous community meetings and focus groups. The final list of questions and materials will be available closer to the Forum date, after these events have taken place.


March 10, 2022

Panel: PT-1015

Day/Time: Thursday, May 26, 10:15am – 11:15am


What it takes: Successful Open Publishing Programs

Presenters

  • Amy Song, Pressbooks

Description

From my position as customer success manager of Pressbooks, I have watched a number of institutions start and grow their open publishing operations, usually from within the library. It has been a great pleasure to see these programs become more formalized, and to watch the open books and other forms of OER impact students’ lives.

For this session, I have gathered stories from folk behind some of the successful open publishing programs I’ve seen. I will begin by discussing the story of how they got involved in open publishing. Did they advocate for the creation of the program? Were they teaching at the time and needed an alternative textbook? What struck them about open publishing?

Next, I will list the challenges, successes, and surprises involved in growing open publishing programs. The goal with this portion of the session is to share practical advice derived from real life experiences.

Finally, I’ll ask the audience to share their experiences doing the labour of open publishing. This portion of the panel will be an open conversation, during which we’ll pull out key pieces of advice to turn into a blog post that can be shared throughout the open publishing community.


Conversations with OER Creators: Advice for Accessibility

Presenters

  • Elena Azadbakht, Health Sciences Librarian, University of Nevada; Reno
  • Teresa Schultz, Social Sciences Librarian, University of Nevada, Reno

Description

Open educational resources (OER) aren’t truly accessible to all if they’re not made accessible for disabled users. However, making OER accessible is not easy and can come with plenty of barriers, including lack of time, money, guidance, and user-friendly tools. With barriers to accessibility already identified, less is known about what leads to successfully making an OER accessible. This presentation will share the results of a qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews with OER authors and support staff – including librarians – to discover factors that helped lead to known accessible open textbooks, such as having a supportive team and input from students. The presenters will discuss the common themes from these interviews and how librarians who support the publishing of OER can incorporate them into their own work. The presentation will also discuss what role the broader library and open education community can play in supporting this important work, including providing support and advocating for accessible authoring and hosting platforms.


March 10, 2022

Workshop: Your Input Needed – An Interactive Session to Improve Usability and Findability of OJS Documentation

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 25,  2:30pm – 5:00pm

Presenters

  • Mariya Maistrovskaya, Digital Publishing Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries
  • Amanda Stevens, Associate Director of Publishing Services and Support, Public Knowledge Project

Description

Open Journal Systems (OJS) is the most widely used journal publishing software in the world, and popular with library publishers. It is developed by a small team at the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and supported by a large community of users and developers worldwide. PKP’s Documentation Interest Group (DIG) was started in 2017 to coordinate documentation as a whole and to develop and maintain user guides and resources about how to use PKP software and best practices in scholarly publishing. Composed of community members and staff, it is a very active group that has collaboratively created and updated almost all of the documentation that is available in the Documentation Hub.

While the Documentation Hub is widely used, it is evident that its growing content has outpaced its current organizational structure. Users frequently complain that it is difficult to locate resources. The DIG is looking to improve the structure to make it easier for our users to find the resources they need. In order to do that, it is critical for us to receive input from our users on how they would categorize our documentation and where they would look for a certain topic.

We would like to invite users of OJS and other PKP software who attend the Library Publishing Forum in 2022 to share their feedback on how to improve the Documentation Hub. In this session we will facilitate a card sorting exercise and focus group to determine user pathways to information and solicit other input on how we can improve the usability of PKP’s Documentation Hub. The same interactive exercises will be done during each hour of the workshop, so participants can choose to attend the first or second hour. Participants are asked to bring a laptop or tablet if they are able to.


March 10, 2022

Workshop: Getting Started with Library Publishing Workflow Documentation

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 25,  2:30pm – 5:00pm

Presenters

  • Katherine Skinner, Educopia Institute
  • Brandon Locke, Educopia Institute

Description

Drawing on the lessons learned through more than two years of the IMLS-funded Library Publishing Workflows (LPW) project (https://educopia.org/library-publishing-workflows/), this workshop will provide participants with the tools, resources, and support they need to get started with workflow documentation. Participants will then have an opportunity to get a strong start on their documentation process.

This workshop will begin with a brief introduction to the LPW project, the methods the project team employed, example documentation, and the reflection tools developed to make the documentation useful and actionable. The majority of the workshop will consist of structured time for participants to sketch out a rough draft of their workflow, have a review session with a partner to identify gaps or unclear descriptions, and then reflect on practices through the paradigm of one or more of the recently released LPW reflection tools.

This workshop will provide participants with a strong start to their workflow documentation process, as well as the motivation, knowledge, and tools to complete their documentation in the days, weeks, and months following the Forum.


March 10, 2022

Workshop: A Focus Group on In-Progress Revisions to the Library Publishing Curriculum

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 25,  2:30pm – 5:00pm

Presenters

  • Cheryl E. Ball, moderator
  • Other Curriculum Board members TBA

Description

This workshop will allow participants to provide feedback to the Library Publishing Curriculum revisions that have been undertaken by the Curriculum Board since 2020, with a particular focus on reviewing a brand new Introduction module and highlighting proposed revisions to the Policies module. Access to a draft of the new Introduction module will be made available via the LPC Listserv in advance of the conference, and opportunities to engage with the document and offer peer review, feedback, comments, and additional revision suggestions will be welcome both virtually (prior to the conference in the Google Doc) and in person. Focused discussions on areas of need in the Introduction and in the Policy modules will take place in this workshop. While it will be helpful to read the draft Intro before attending the in-person workshop, it is not a requirement.


March 10, 2022

Full Session: Multimodal Monographs: Content, Collaboration, Community

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 25,  11:45am – 12:45pm

Presenters

  • Allison Levy, Digital Scholarship Editor, Brown University
  • Sarah McKee, Senior Associate Director for Publishing, Emory University

Description

In April 2021 Brown University and Emory University hosted a virtual summit focused on university-based approaches to developing enhanced or interactive digital monographs for publication by a university press. The summit convened grantees in the Digital Monograph cohort supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and included institutional support staff (e.g., digital scholarship editors, digital humanities and scholarly communications librarians) and representatives from presses who are publishing these works, as well as some of the scholar-authors who have intentionally chosen the digital environment to advance and present their arguments.

The summit attendees examined a selection of eight diverse digital monograph publications, either recently released or in development, to think through some of the most pressing questions facing stakeholders in digital scholarly publishing today: How have we adapted, transformed, or disrupted the familiar publishing process? What can we learn from the publishing models that have emerged to date? What challenges are we facing today, and what might the next few years look like? How can we encourage a shared vocabulary for these digital publications within the wider scholarly communications landscape?

The proposed session will present the preliminary outcomes of the summit discussions, to be reported by a white paper in late 2022, on topics ranging from cross-institutional collaborations, professional development, community engagement and the co-production of knowledge, and diversity, equity, and inclusion to open access, funding models, peer review, metadata and discoverability, preservation, and sustainability. We’ll open the floor to discussion, inviting attendees to share their own experiences or raise new questions that we should consider addressing in the report. The LPF session would provide the first post-summit opportunity for dialogue and reflection on the current and future landscape of digital publishing as well as the growing alignment between research libraries and scholarly presses.


March 10, 2022

Full Session: Strategic Career Management

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 25,  11:45am – 12:45pm

Presenters

  • John W. Warren, Director and Associate Professor MPS in Publishing, George Washington University
  • Additional speakers TBD

Description

Strategic planning principles can be applied to your personal career to create direction, clarity, and focus, ultimately leading to a more rewarding and successful career. This Interactive Session/Workshop focuses on strategies that library publishing professionals, in a wide range of career levels and job functions, can take to plan, manage, and advance their careers. We will introduce principles of strategic planning, goal setting, prioritization, and more that can be applied toward personal career development. We’ll discuss key skills that will be needed in 2030 and beyond; how these skills might differ for editorial, marketing, production, and management; the value of professional certification and advanced degrees for publishing professionals; and awareness of the need for publishing to be accessible and to include people with diverse backgrounds and perspectives. The strategies, tools, and action steps we’ll explore in this interactive session will aid you in mentoring others, benefit your team and your organization, and help you to advance through the profession and achieve your goals.


March 10, 2022

Panel: PW-1030

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 25, 10:30am – 11:30am


Let’s talk about academic labour: Changes in the academy and independent scholarly publishing

Presenters

  • Jessica Lange, McGill University
  • Sarah Severson, University of Alberta

Description

Trends in academia indicate declining numbers of tenure-track faculty, the increased use of contract academic staff, as well as an increasingly neoliberal academy. Scholarly journal editors typically require stable, academic positions in order to “afford” them the space (and incentive) to contribute volunteer labour to the academic knowledge commons. If academic labour overall is more precarious, how does this impact academic scholarly publishing, in particular, the independent scholarly journals who are supported by library publishers?

Furthermore, there are troubling trends about who make up full-time versus contract academic appointments. Research out of Canada suggests tenure-track faculty are less diverse than contract appointments. If tenure-track faculty are the persons best incentivized and supported to undertake editorial work, what does that signal for improving the diversity of scholarly publishing?

Using survey and interview data on labour, compensation, and organizational structures for non-commercial, Canadian scholarly journals, the presenters will discuss their results considering these trends and the implications for library publishers. The presentation will include space for participants to discuss their library’s publishing models and how they see changes in the academy affecting independent journal production.


Should library publishers offer plagiarism screening? A pilot project at York University Libraries

Presenters

  • Tomasz Mrozewski, Digital Publishing Librarian, York University

Description

A key tenet of high-quality scholarly publishing is rigorous oversight of research integrity. In its Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing, The Coalition on Publication Ethics (COPE) recommends that “[p]ublishers and editors shall take reasonable steps to identify and prevent the publication of papers where research misconduct has occurred, including plagiarism.” However, scholar-led platinum Open Access publications hosted by library publishers often cannot effectively screen for plagiarism because of limited human and financial resources.

This presentation describes an ongoing, one-year pilot project at York University Libraries to provide library published journals with access to CrossRef’s Similarity Check service. The pilot will help York University Libraries determine whether to provide broader access to plagiarism screening software as part of its York Digital Journals publishing program and will explore questions such as: what proportion of editorial decisions are influenced by the plagiarism screening? Are the similarity reports useful? Do the editors have sufficient technical and human resources to interpret the similarity reports, and what support would they need going forward? Does plagiarism screening support editor confidence? Does use of plagiarism screening impact journals’ credibility among authors, indexers, or with organizations such as COPE?

This presentation discusses the rationale for the pilot project as well as the implementation. It considers arguments for libraries to offer plagiarism screening services to their journals, as well as possible alternatives.


March 10, 2022

Full Session: Let’s Talk! Building Library Support for Scholarly Societies Publications

Day/Time: Wednesday, May 25,  10:30am – 11:30am

Presenters

  • Emma Molls, University of Minnesota
  • Lauren Collister, University of Pittsburgh
  • Harrison W. Inefuku, Iowa State University

Description

This roundtable session will feature 3 library publishers with different perspectives on publishing, and consulting with, scholarly society journals. The presenters will share financial, outreach, and workflow examples from their publishing programs and guide conversations on the following topics:
– how societies approach journal publishing
– money, money money! – how societies “shop” for publishers
– mission alignment between libraries and societies

The session will be open for all attendees to share their own insight, ask questions, and consider how library publishing may be a solution for more scholarly societies.

This session will also be of interest to scholarly communication librarians who consult with on-campus faculty/researchers about society journals that are not published by library publishers, as topics of open access mandates and society journal business models will be discussed. It is the presenters’ hope that this session will provide a space for sharing questions and experiences that have not been asked openly on listservs or Twitter. This session will be free of fear of embarrassment or repercussions!


March 10, 2022

Full Session: The scoop on XML article-level metadata and why it’s critical to equitable research dissemination

Day/Time: Thursday, May 19,  3:45pm – 4:45pm

Presenters

  • Alice Meadows, Director of Community Engagement at NISO
  • Brian Cody, Co-Founder and CEO of Scholastica

Description

For your journal articles to reach the broadest possible readership, having them served up via online discovery services is paramount. That generally requires producing machine-readable XML metadata to deposit into content registration and indexing databases. Kind of like ice cream, XML comes in various flavors (aka different formats and schemas).

So what’s the scoop on XML metadata formatting, and how can it support more equitable research dissemination and DEI in scholarly publishing? During this session, we’ll overview:
– JATS XML — the standard markup language for journal article metadata developed by the National Information Standards Organization (NISO)
– How the quality of the machine-readable metadata associated with articles (or lack thereof) can affect scholars’ levels of representation in the research literature
– Why publishers should prioritize producing rich, standards-aligned metadata and where to start


March 10, 2022

Full Session: A library publisher, library consortium and library journal walk into a bar: A case study of adopting collaborative funding infrastructure to support library publishing

Day/Time: Thursday, May 19,  3:45pm – 4:45pm

Presenters

  • Curtis Brundy, Iowa State University
  • Harrison W. Inefuku, Iowa State University
  • Sharla Lair, LYRASIS

Description

In July 2021, the Iowa State University (ISU) Digital Press became the publisher of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. ISU Digital Press committed to fully fund JLSC for the first year, but only up to half of the funding after that. The Digital Press and the JLSC Editorial Board were faced with the task that so many journals must take on—fundraising. In order to maintain JLSC as a OA publication with no charges to authors, and the financial constraints that resulted from the change in publisher, JLSC sought a broader network of support. They believed that broad and diverse community funding support would strengthen the reputation of the journal in the field and ensure long-term sustainability if they highlighted its inclusive organization and the support by multiple organizations. So, in late 2021, JLSC and the ISU Digital Press formed a partnership with the LYRASIS Open Access Community Investment Program (OACIP). OACIP is a community-driven framework that enables all stakeholders to strategically evaluate and fund OA publications with the goal to help match prospective funders with non-profit publishers and journal editorial boards seeking funding for OA publishing. Given the nature of the journal, we think it is an excellent example to showcase a non-profit approach to OA without article processing fees, supported by a multiple stakeholder funding community.

In this presentation, we will share what we are learning through this unique partnership by outlining what is working and what needs improvement. We will discuss if this case study is replicable and scalable for the library publishing community, and then, together, consider emerging opportunities for sustaining library publishing and further bolstering the Library Publishing Coalition’s commitment to anti-racism, diversity, equity, opportunity, and inclusion.


March 10, 2022

Panel and Lightning Talks: VT-230

Day/Time: Thursday, May 19, 2:30pm – 3:30pm


The BCcampus Open Publishing Suite: Guides for Your Open Publishing Initiative

Presenters

  • Arianna Cheveldave, BCcampus
  • Kaitlyn Zheng, BCcampus

Description

Since 2012, BCcampus Open Education has funded and published open educational resources for the post-secondary system in British Columbia, Canada. Over the years, BCcampus has developed a suite of support resources for open access publishing, including the Getting Started Guide; a publishing style guide; the Accessibility Toolkit; and the Self-Publishing Guide.

In this session, we will discuss some of the publishing tasks that are simplified by these guides, such as communication of author responsibilities, stylistic consistency, and technical accessibility. We will give a brief overview of each of these guides and demonstrate how they may be used by publishers and authors.

In a nutshell:
-The Getting Started Guide includes timelines, workflows, and best practices for OER authors.
-The BCcampus publishing style guide defines style guidelines, standard CSS workarounds, and templates for front and back matter.
-The Accessibility Toolkit contains practical information on making web content accessible.
-The Self-Publishing Guide provides details on the preparation, planning, writing, publication, and maintenance of an open textbook.

The open licenses on our support guides allow anyone to use, modify, and share them. We encourage other publishing initiatives to adopt and adapt these guides.


Introducing Lantern: A Multiformat OER Publishing Toolkit

Presenters

  • Chris Diaz, Digital Publishing Librarian, Northwestern University
  • Lauren McKeen McDonald, Open Education Librarian, Northwestern University

Description

Lantern is a free and open-source digital publishing toolkit that applies minimal computing principles to the production and maintenance of open educational resources (OER). Librarians play an essential role in the publishing of OER at colleges and universities, often providing technology services for the production, hosting, and archiving of OER. Lantern provides workflows, templates, and instructions for publishing OER without the cost and sustainability concerns associated with repository systems and publishing platforms that are typically used. We use minimal computing as a lens for reducing software dependencies and vendor reliance in order to provide a methodology for using open infrastructure for OER publishing. At its core, Lantern uses Pandoc to produce OER in HTML, PDF, and EPUB formats by providing extensible document templates and shell scripts to fit a variety of common OER publishing use cases. More importantly, Lantern provides an entry point for new users of open source software. No programming or command line knowledge is assumed. Lantern includes step-by-step instructions on taking an OER manuscript in Microsoft Word format and producing a static HTML website with multiple OER output formats on your computer (some software installation required) or entirely online (no software installation required). Lantern was developed with support from the Association of Research Libraries that provided funding for a multi-institutional Librarian Review Panel, whose feedback was incorporated in the toolkit’s initial release. This presentation will provide a high-level overview of Lantern, introduce minimal computing concepts, and invite the library publishing community to use Lantern on their next OER project.


Lightning Talks

Can a Monthly Newsletter Increase Journal Publishing Best Practices?

Presenters

  • Kate Cawthorn, Digital Projects Librarian, University of Calgary Libraries and Cultural Resources

Description

This presentation will explore the impact of a monthly newsletter on the adoption of publishing best practices by library hosted journals. As part of the shift from a journal hosting service to a library publishing service, we are promoting the adoption of journal publishing best practices by our hosted journals. A key tool to promote these practices is a monthly newsletter to journal teams that includes at least one best practice in a “quick tip” format that a journal manager could implement within a few minutes. Prior to sending these newsletters, we assessed each journal’s current implementation or lack of implementation of that month’s best practice, and then checked again one month later to see if the level of adoption has increased. The goal of this project is to determine if a library publishing services newsletter is an effective way of increasing journal level adoption of publishing best practices and we hope that this information is useful for other small library publishers with limited resources.


Success, Failures, and the In-Between: Reflecting on a medical-student operated open access journal as it passes its third year in operation

Presenters

  • Benjamin Saracco, Research and Digital Services Faculty Librarian, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
  • Amanda Adams MLS, Reference & Instruction Faculty Librarian, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University

Description

The Cooper Rowan Medical Journal, established in November 2018 by a team of eager undergraduate medical students, clinical faculty, and faculty librarians, with little to no back-end scholarly publishing experience, is now approaching the publication of its third volume. The publication is indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals with over 106 submissions internationally, yet currently faces some key challenges. From the point-of-view of the librarians involved, this lightning talk will reflect on initial hurdles in getting this project off the ground, establishing consistent workflows, and bumps in the road the team experienced along the way. Senior editorial board staffing, training of early career researchers, and quirks in the publication’s software platform lead to issues around the speed of publication. As medical school operated journals increase in frequency, this lightning talk will help others interested in carrying out similar endeavors learn from our project’s successes and challenges.


Synchronizing the Asynchronous: Working through the Library Publishing Workshop as a Cohort

Presenters

  • Jill Cirasella, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Gail Steinhart, Cornell University

Description

Building on an idea hatched at the 2021 Library Publishing Forum, we created an informal learning community and professional development opportunity centered on the Library Publishing Curriculum Virtual Workshop Series. Our plan was for participants to work through one unit per month, asynchronously, and to meet in groups to synchronize our experiences, discussing and reviewing each unit. We report on the logistics of organizing such a group, the benefits and challenges experienced by both participants and organizers, and recommendations for a successful learning experience.


Inclusive Language in NIST Technical Series Publications

Presenters

  • Kathryn Miller, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Description

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Research Library occupies the unique position of serving NIST both as publisher of the NIST Technical Series, and in an archival capacity, responsible for collecting and preserving copies of NIST’s publications. In June 2020, NIST received comments from the public about biased and exclusionary language in our NIST Technical Series publications (e.g., master/slave and blacklist/whitelist). While the authors responsible for the publications in question discussed how they were going to address the comments, the Research Library decided to update our author instructions with a new section on using inclusive language. After researching and developing an internal draft, we solicited feedback from NIST colleagues in July 2020, including those in our DEI offices and groups, and from the public after external release in February 2021. The guidance changed dramatically over this 7-month period, as we pivoted from a table of words to avoid and their preferred alternatives to contextual examples taken directly from historical NIST publications. During this project we learned that there is no template or standard process for developing inclusive language guidelines that will work for all library publishers. However, it is important to recognize that this activity will feel personal, as the words, idioms, and phrases we use are woven into our personalities and experiences. The only way to succeed in providing an inclusive, welcoming space in technical publications is to solicit feedback from as many under-represented groups as possible, and approach conversations about inclusive language with respect and humility. Future plans for this project include reviewing and updating the guidance on a yearly basis, creating a disclaimer for historical publications, and updating our procedures to include editing biased language as a reason for publishing a revision.


March 10, 2022

Full Session: Inclusion and Representation in the Scholarly Ecosystem

Day/Time: Thursday, May 19,  2:30pm – 3:30pm

Presenters

  • Caitlin Tyler-Richards, Michigan State
  • Lea Johnston, Editorial, Getty Research Institute (GRI) Publications
  • Elizabeth Scarpelli, University of Cincinnati Press (Moderator)

Description

What roles can scholarly publishers play in the work of anti-racism within the scholarly ecosystem? While publishers serve as intermediaries between scholars and libraries, greater transparency can help us discover areas within that ecosystem that could benefit from greater collaboration. Scholarly publishers are finding new approaches that are thoughtful and inclusive in all stages of their work. This will be an opportunity for people in library publishing programs to pick the brains of specialists from university presses, discussing topics such as inclusive approaches to peer review, representation in design decisions, and strategies for making texts widely available, accessible, and discoverable.